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DIY

  • All About Skirt Silhouettes

    PREVIEW Just as there are plenty of dress shapes and silhouettes to choose from, skirts have their own line-up and applications, too! If it's your first time making a skirt or you're just looking for a reference to help research for your next project, we've got you covered!

    ALINEA-LINE

    An A-LINE design is a simple one that is fitted at the waist and gradually widens towards the hem of the skirt. With this design, it appears to have the shape of a capital letter “A.” The length of these skirts varies, but anywhere between mid-thigh and knee-height is common. It’s a flattering look for many body types and is easy to make, too! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Poplins, Brocades, and Tweeds!                

    BOXPLEATEDBOX-PLEATED

    The BOX-PLEATED skirt is a rather sophisticated look with its crisp folds and repeated pleats. The shape of the pleats can be maintained from the top to the bottom of the skirt, but this can vary, too, if you prefer the pleats to flow towards the hem of the skirt. The number and size of pleats across the skirt can be different too—big and small, a few to many! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Cottons, Silks, and Sateens!              

    TIEREDTIERED

    If you’re looking for a versatile style to work into your wardrobe, consider sewing yourself a tiered skirt! Tiered skirts are designed to highlight layers which are usually gathered to provide mobility and a slightly ruffled appearance. The layers can be either free-flowing or attached. Tiered skirts are a great opportunity for working with color-blocking, and changing the length of the tiers of your skirt can change your whole ensemble around! Click here for a look at a tiered skirt design we made here at Mood! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Jersey Knits, Crepes, and Viole!            

    MERMAIDMERMAID

    A MERMAID skirt is a more stylized design; the skirt is usually tight and fitted from the waist line to about the knee or lower before flouncing out. The flounce is usually long and asymmetrical and can even have a bit of a train behind the wearer. These skirts are often made using fabrics with good drape, since this is what likens the flounce to look like the end of a mermaid’s tail! These types of skirts are great for formal gatherings and ballroom occasions. We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Crepe Back Satins, Silks, and Dupioni!              

    TRUMPETTRUMPET

    TRUMPET skirts are similar to MERMAID skirts, but the flounce on the end of the sheathed part of the skirt is usually shorter and has an even hemline. Also, where MERMAID skirts tend to be longer or to-the-floor in length, TRUMPET skirt hemlines are usually above mid-calf length. Paired with a blouse or a dress shirt, TRUMPET skirts can be great business-casual wear! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Satins, Suitings, and Sateens!                

    PENCILPENCIL

    PENCIL skirts are classy and stylish! They’re wonderful office wear or for when you want to meet up with friends. A PENCIL skirt is designed to have a straight shape that skims close to your silhouette without being too constricting. Depending on what you pair with it, pencil skirts can look really sharp! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Suitings, Sateens, and Wool!                

    BODYCONBODYCON

    BODYCON skirts are the most fitted design available. They are fitted tighter than PENCIL skirts and are usually made with fabric that stretches to ensure mobility. BODYCON skirts emphasize a fitted lower silhouette, so they’re often paired with a loose, flowing top or one that shows off one’s midriff! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Neoprenes, Jersey Knits, and Ponte.            

    TULIPTULIP

    TULIP skirts are a beautiful and elegant design. Their hemline scoops down a bit towards the bottom and overlaps once in the front to give the appearance of tulip petals folded over each other. This design is sometimes coupled with pleats at the waist to provide drape and flow. This type of skirt is another great option for office wear or for those days where you want to dress up an extra bit! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Silk Georgette, Ponte, and Silk Charmeuse!              

    WRAPWRAP

    Like the TULIP skirt, a WRAP skirt overlaps once in the front, but where the TULIP hemline is a little more consistent in design, WRAP skirt hemline is usually a bit more freeform. You’ll find anything from asymmetrical designs to even hemlines, and many even have ties that wrap around to the front, too. We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Pique, Silks, and Suitings!                  

    HANDKERCHIEFHANDKERCHIEF

    HANDKERCHIEF skirts are an earthy type of skirt design that slightly resemble TIERED skirts; these skirts utilize the tiers, but they boast a triangular shape that juts loose and easy down from the waistline. They also highlight the use of many layers with thin fabric for a free-flowing skirt style that won’t risk a see-through mishap! This skirt style is very feminine and is great for casual outings. We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Poplin, Silk Chiffon, and Silk Georgette!                

    HILOWHI-LOW

    HI-LOW skirts are gorgeous and chic. Their design doesn’t stray much, as its focus is on the difference of height between the front of its skirt hem and the back. The back of the hemline is always longer than the front which usually falls around mid-thigh. While flowing fabrics are common for this skirt design, stiffer fabrics like brocades are an option, too! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Brocades, Crepe Back Satin, and 4-Ply Crepe Silk!                

    SARONGSARONG

    SARONG skirts are a style that’s most popular as beach attire! Usually made of loose and unrestricting fabrics, these skirts are comfortable and perfect for lounging and having a good time. They’re like WRAP dresses, though SARONG dresses are usually accent with a flourish at the side, usually starting at the hipline. SARONG skirts are safest as casual-wear—comfort is their top priority! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Jersey Knit, 4-Ply Crepe Silk, and Poplin!              

    MINIMINI

    The MINI skirt—one of the three basic skirt designs, and the shortest! MINI skirts are popular designs for making with circle skirt patterns. They fall between mid-thigh and knee height and their panels can be gathered or flat. The choice is yours! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Pique, Denim, and Suede!                  

    MIDIMIDI

    A MIDI skirt is the second of the three basic skirt designs. Put simply, a MIDI is a skirt whose hemline falls around knee-height on the wearer. These, too, can be pleated or flat in design, so long as the length is maintained. Where MINI skirts often hug the wearer’s frame a bit closer (like an A-LINE), MIDI skirts look great with a gradual flare to a wider hem. Take advantage of a circle skirt pattern for this one! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Satin, Suiting, and Eyelet!              

    MAXIMAXI

    And finally, we have the MAXI skirt! MAXIs are a long style of skirt that ranges from comfy to fashionable! You’ll often find these made of jersey and other stretch knits, but don’t be fooled! MAXI skirts go beautifully with stiffer fabrics like tweeds and sateens, and they’re great for every season! Don’t be afraid to pair a light MAXI with a midriff tank or a heavy one with a turtle neck. This style is versatile and comfortable, so take advantage of it! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Tweeds, Sateens, and Jersey Knits!                 These are the more common skirt designs and silhouettes, but we tried to cover a wide range to help you get started! Which of these is your favorite style? What style will you make for your next project?  
  • Mood DIY: Paneled Workout Leggings

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    The holidays are over, which means everyone is now scrambling to get healthy and work off all that feasting they did last week! Rather than go shopping and buy a whole workout outfit, why not make your own yoga pants? They can be customized to fit your exact style and body type, so they'll be the comfiest pants you own!

    Fabrics & materials used:

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    This project probably took about 30 minutes, start to finish, so if you're looking for an easy DIY to start off the new year, this one is absolutely perfect.

    To draft the pattern, I followed this sew-along that another blogger did this summer. To make them a little more sporty, I added the mesh panel to the bottom of each leg, which you can see above!

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    Once I drew up my pattern, all I needed to do was cut out the shape I wanted at the bottom. Since the mesh had a slightly tighter stretch than the jersey, I widened the mesh panels just slightly.

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    Since I don't have a serger, a zig-zag stitch did the trick just fine! I also added a 3" waistband to the top, skipping the elastic inside since the compression jersey stayed up fine without it. The selvedge of the mesh also looked pretty interesting so I chose to leave the leg bottoms unfinished.

    Are you going to be trying your own leggings? Which fabrics are you going to use?

  • Holiday Style | "Velour Jumpsuit"

    The festive holiday season is quickly approaching. Now is the time to start thinking about pulling together all your fabulous looks! Here's a great style idea for all you busy moms, or anyone who's looking for a hassle-free look. Combining comfort and style has become one of my top priorities. Being a busy wife, and full-time mommy of two, can be very stressful around the holiday seasons- especially when trying to get everyone dressed! I thought to myself, "How cute and easy would it be to make a one-piece velour jumper?" Perfect actually! I can get everyone dressed and still have time for me! Here's how I made this quick and easy pull-on velour jumper! Seriously it only took me an hour and a half to sew!! What I used: Vogue Pattern V9160 option B- removed pockets, and zipper. Fabric: Apple Butter Stretch Rayon Velour I went for the more "relaxed" fit so I removed the zipper and pockets. I am able to pull it on and off very easily! The velour is very soft and has plenty of stretch. This Apple Butter color is perfect for the holidays! You have to check out all the beautiful color options available on moodfabrics.com Enjoy!!  

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  • Mood Style: New Year's Eve LBD

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    The pressure to find the perfect New Year's Eve dress is always high. Do you go sleek and sexy, or sparkly and fun? No matter what style you love, you can never go wrong with a little black dress!

    For this one, I kept the silhouette fairly simple and chose to mix it up with the details. Overall, it was a really fun make, and it's so cute that you hardly need extra jewelry!

    Fabrics & materials used:

    The pattern was self-drafted, but I drew up some diagrams to show how it all came together. To start, the front bodice is a 21"x13" rectangle that I transformed into 5 box pleats (each 1.25" wide). My model had a 34" bust, so you may need to adjust your initial rectangle and pleat sizes if you'll be making this yourself.

    Pleats

    Ultimately, I ended up with a 6"x13" rectangle with 1.25" pleats and .25" spaces in between. On the left and right sides, there's also .25" folded under; this acted as seam allowance when I sewed on the remainder of the bodice.

    Pleats 2

    The bodice side panels were 10.5" high so the pleats extend a few inches above it when sewn together. I cut out the shape below, and added in a large dart toward the front.

    Bodice

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    The skirt is very similar to a basic circle skirt, with a 6" panel in the front to align with the bodice pleats. I drew up the shape of it below - it calls for one straight rectangle panel, and two semi-circle panels (one on each side of the rectangle).

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    The back closed up with a 9" invisible zipper, and I finished up the dress with some silver metal straps. Each was hand sewn on and connected to a 4.5" triangle on the back.

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    Paired with some DIY red bottom heels, and the perfect outfit is complete!

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    So what look are you putting together for this NYE? Is the LBD your style, or are you going metallic like our other style blogger?

  • Mood DIY: Make Your Own Red Bottom Heels

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    The season of holiday parties is upon us, and it calls for some style! It's easy to throw on that LBD or your favorite outfit to shine in, but what can you do to add a last minute subtle pop to your ensemble? How about a chic pair of red bottoms!

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    Whether you're restoring your shoes or just getting inspired by those $700 dream heels, this sole paint from Angelus is an absolute game changer.

    Angelus is known for quality leather paint, often used for shoe repair and alterations, but this new item from their "Walk On" series is fantastic. Now you can even change the bottom of your shoes without the fear of scuffing them! Mood currently carries it in red and black, and it's beyond easy to apply.

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    I applied 3 coats to the soles of some heels I had laying in my closet, letting them dry for an hour between each coat, and I can't wait to pair them with the perfect outfit. What would you style them with? Black cigarette pants? A vintage skirt? The possibilities are absolutely endless!

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  • Holiday Fun: "No Sew" DIY Santa Hat

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    Tis the season for fun holiday crafts and DIY projects! My kids always get super excited when I make things for them. It makes them feel special, and it just melts my heart to see them smile! Trust me, I know how easy it is to run out and grab the inexpensive hats that fall apart, or the expensive character hats every year. Well here's a quick and easy "No Sew" tutorial on how to make santa hats that look stunning! Let's get started, heres what you'll need: The first thing we need to do is measure the circumference of the wearers head. Once you get that measurement, you can start to draft your pattern.

    Take your ruler and draw the base of your hat with the circumference measurement. Next divide that measurement in two.  Now you need to determine your hat height measurement. Here's what I did: Take your measuring tape and starting at the top of the ear, drape it over the head and let hang down to the other side. Note the desired length. Use this measurement to draw a line straight down the center. Continue by drawing a line from top to bottom of each outer edge creating a "Triangle" shape. Tie a string to a pencil the length of your hat measurement and swing outward to each side creating a slight curve (or trace freehand like I did).

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    *Tip: Start warming up your glue gun and make sure to keep it out of kids' reach, it gets really hot! You can now cut out your pattern. With right sides together, place fabric on the fold. We are only going to have one seam along the side. Place your pattern along the fold, leaving some room for desired seam allowance and cut. Now grab your glue gun. Start running a bead of glue at least 2" at a time down the side. Work quickly pressing firmly to close the seam. The glue dries fast.

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    Once the glue has dried, turn the hat right side out. You will use the same circumference measurement to cut a strip of faux fur trim. Determine your trim height (I used 2 3/4" as my trim height measurement) and cut. Starting at the bottom edge, align the trim with the seam of the hat and glue into place. Run the bead of glue 1/8" in from the edge of the trim. Once the bottom edge is dry, glue down the top edge the same way.

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    Now onto the pom-pom at the top of the hat. Truthfully I was searching everywhere for the crafting pom-poms and I couldn't find the size or quality I needed. With that being said, I decided to create one! I used a large candle to trace a circle shape. It measured at about 3" in diameter. Once I determined the center of the pom-pom, I used a pea-sized drop of glue to attach it to the top of my hat. Next, I slowly dabbed small amounts of glue around the edges of the pom-pom. I pinched and glued all it the way around the top of the hat.

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    Here's a look at the finished hat's! I added a satin bow around my daughters hat to give it a sweet touch! The kids loved them! I hope you enjoyed this post, and have fun creating your own!! :)

    11finished hats

  • Mood Style: Sewing a Chanel-Style Jacket

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    Sometimes inspiration comes from the oddest places. In this case, I knew I wanted to make a Chanel-inspired jacket with one of Mood's fantastic new tweeds, but I just couldn't find the right pattern for it. Should I go classic? Should I do something with a little twist?

    Cut to me stumbling upon a Sailor Moon costume pattern. That's right, this classy blazer was inspired by a sailor scout uniform. Crazy how versatile patterns can be sometimes!

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    Fabrics & materials used:

    I went with view A of Simplicity 1092, choosing to also add a lining of the black cotton sateen. In lieu of bias-bound edges, I hand-stitched some 1/4" gold and black trim, which matched the main fabric perfectly and brought out the subtle metallic gold in the tweed beautifully!

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    The pattern also called for some hook and eye closures along the front, but I substituted them for 5 snaps to make it a little more stable when closed.

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    Ultimately, I think it's an interesting little jacket, especially for the upcoming holidays! The unique lapel gives it an almost off-the-shoulder kind of feel, which would look absolutely stunning with some jewelry.

    Are you going to be making anything similar soon? Which fabrics would you make it with?

  • All About Fabric Care: Luxury Fabrics

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    With all the types of fabric blends, cleaning materials, and temperature settings, maintenance and care for fabrics can be pretty confusing and intimidating! There are some general rules such as don't over-wash and when in doubt, use cold water, but the rules and methods of care do go a bit deeper than that... depending on the fabric, of course!

    That's why we've decided to create this series of care and methods for fabrics! In this series of guides, we'll give you short and easy lists for your reference that will note qualities of the fabrics, how to wash them (or not wash them), and when it's safe (or not!) to iron a fabric! We'll start with a small group--the Luxury fabrics--consisting of Silk, Velvet, Wool, and Leather.

    Silk_JPEG

    Spun from organic fibers, silk fabrics are probably one of the easier fabrics to recognize because of it's subtle sheen and smooth texture. Silk glides over the body when worn, it drapes beautifully, and it breathes well, making it a very popular choice to wear. It's also a natural fiber that's strong and durable, so it will last a long time if you take good care of it! Silks also come in a large variety of prints and design due to their capacity for taking dyes well, which gives seamstresses lots of options to work with.

    However, because of their organic qualities, silk fabrics can be damaged easily if you're not careful. Generally speaking, excessive heat is a big "NO" for silks. Sunlight, direct ironing, hot water--these conditions can cause things like fading, yellowing/browning/burning, and shrinking in silks. These methods should be avoided unless the tag of your garment or fabric reads otherwise when caring for silk fabrics.

    With that said, silks may be sturdy in their weaving, but due to the blends they are used in, their care requirements can vary. When it comes to silks, always make sure to consult the directions or tags for your garment or fabric, and never store silk products in direct sunlight. When it doubt, keep them dry and cool!

    If you'd like to see some silk fabrics, start here!:

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    Velvet_JPEG

    Did you know that velvet fabrics aren't just one type of fabric like cotton or silk, but that they're actually a combination of layers of different types of fabrics? This fuzzy and textured beauty is known for it's thick and plush feel, and the wonderful stretch makes it a popular comfort fabric. It's also a great fabric for autumn and winter because of how warm it is!

    Caring for your velvet is more straight-forward than caring for silk, but it does still take a bit of work. Generally, cool water is best to clean velvet with, because keeping velvet in high temperatures can damage or shrink it. This is another fabric that you should always consult your tags or directions with for the best care methods for each individual garment or fabric of velvet.

    One important thing to keep in mind, though, is that you should never iron velvet.Velvet has its own unique texture, whether you're working with crushed velvet or not, and ironing can ruin this!

    To remove major wrinkles like creases and folds, use a steamer on the wrong side of the fabric. Steamers remove wrinkles quickly without ruining velvet's texture.

    If you'd like to see some velvet fabrics, start here!:

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    Wool fabrics are a durable and functional fabric! They're known for their thick, scratchy layers, and they're great at keeping you bundled up and warm in the winter. Some wools are softer, especially when blended with other fabrics, and they look best when made into jackets and other garments that require a solid shape! Mature tones and patterns are their game, and they look good with them for a reason. Wools also last a long time; they're flame- and dirt-resistant, and they dry quickly (thanks to the natural fibers!).

    Wool doesn't need a lot of maintenance, but when it does need it, dry-cleaning is the only option. You may think that throwing it in for a quick wash will be fine, but your wool really doesn't need it! Because wool dries quickly, it doesn't hold onto odors or stains, and over-washing fabrics can wear them away if they're not built to be worn down. Wool is one of these fabrics--keep it simple and take your wool to a dry cleaner only when needed!

    Ironing wool takes just as little maintenance; low heat setting and on the wrong side of the fabric or garment. Ironing wool can leave iron marks, so ironing on the wrong side can help prevent these from being visible should any get left behind.

    If you'd like to see some wool fabrics, start here!:

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    Leather is a fabric made from the skin of animals like cows, pigs, and lamb and is most notable for its tough exterior that resists wear and tear, and when treated for it, leather can be water- and fire-resistant, making it a great and long-lasting fabric to work with. A fabric this unique this requires a special  kind of TLC to maintain!

    Because leathers are cured with chemicals during manufacturing, they require special care or dry-cleaning in all cases. Leather is designed to look and function best when it is bone-dry, which means NO washing, steaming, or water for leathers! Excessive heat must also be avoided! Do your best to keep leather away from both extremes; store your leather fabrics and garments in cool and dry places, and if you need to get a piece of leather cleaned, take it to a specialty cleaner. It's a bit inconvenient, but it's necessary to keep your leathers safe!

    If you must iron your leather, you can under two conditions: you must use a very, very low setting as well as a piece of heavy paper for a press cloth. Do not iron your leather directing with your clothing iron. Work slowly and carefully, and only iron as needed (which shouldn't be often!).

    If you'd like to see some leather fabrics, start here!:

    . That's all for luxury fabrics! These are some of the most common fabrics used in fashion sewing, so it's important to know how to take care of them. The last thing you want to do is ruin a beautiful fabric! Do you take good care of your fabrics? Did this article help you learn what to do for your garments when they need cleaning? If you have any stories about caring for types of fabrics, please share them with us!
  • Mood DIY: Free Reversible Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    I love the bomber jacket trend, and ever since I made my first one back in the fall, I knew I wanted to make more. This time, I drew up a pattern for the original women's version and I decided to try one for men too!

    The jacket is completely reversible, so you can essentially have 2 jackets in one, complete with pockets. The one I made in September gave off two very different styles, which I loved. For this one, I kept the inside pretty simple - just navy lining and solid black rib knit. The outside, however, was made with a gorgeous abstract brocade, the same navy lining for the sleeve, and one of Mood's brand new rib knits featuring two dark navy stripes. All-in-all, it looks awesome.

    If you'd like to try out the jacket for yourself, YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THE FREE PATTERN HERE. When laying out your pattern, it should be 6 pages across and 4 pages down. On the first page of the PDF, you'll find a test square and a size chart.

    Recommended fabrics: brocade, jacquard, satin, canvas, faux leather, heavy knits, wool, and medium-weight lining.

    Fabrics & materials I used:

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Pattern Pieces:
    • 1: Front (Women's)
      • Cut 2 of Fabric, mirrored
      • Cut 2 of Lining, mirrored
    • 2: Sleeve (Women's)
      • Cut 4 of Lining (or 2 of lining, and 2 of outer fabric)
      • Cut 2 of Interfacing
    • 3: Pocket
      • Cut 4 of Lining (or 8 of lining if making jacket reversible)
    • 4: Rib Knit Collar
      • Cut 1 of Rib Knit Trim
    • 5: Back (Women's)
      • Cut 1 on fold of Fabric
      • Cut 1 on fold of Lining
    • 6: Front (Men's)
      • Cut 2 of Fabric, mirrored
      • Cut 2 of Lining, mirrored
    • 7: Sleeve (Men's)
      • Cut 4 of Lining (or 2 of lining, and 2 of outer fabric)
      • Cut 2 of Interfacing
    • 8: Rib Knit Collar
      • Cut 1 of Rib Knit Trim
    • 9: Back (Men's)
      • Cut 1 on fold of Fabric
      • Cut 1 on fold of Lining

    1. If making the women's cut of this jacket, begin by sewing the darts on the front panels. This is the main difference between the two patterns.

    2. Sew the pockets onto the bottom corners of the front and back panels, right sides together so they pull out like you see below. The longer side of the pocket pieces should run along the bottom of the jacket, not the sides.

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    3. Place the front and back panels right sides together, lining up the pockets from the bottom. Sew along the dotted line you see below, around the pocket and up the remainder of the side seam.

    4. Pin and/or staystitch the pocket toward the front panel.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    5. If using lining for your outer layer sleeves, reinforce them with interfacing before sewing them together.

    6. Attach the front and back panels at the shoulders and attach the sleeves, right sides together.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    7. Follow steps 1-6 for the lining, skipping the interfacing if desired.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    8. Pin and sew the rib knit collar to the right sides of both, the lining and the outer layer like you see above and below.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    (For your cuffs and waistband, the lengths can vary depending on how tight/stretchy you'd like them. For this one, the cuffs were 8" and the waistband was a full 36".)

    9. The cuffs aren't difficult to sew, however they are a bit difficult to explain. Begin by placing a cuff inside one of the sleeves, right sides together. Sew the cuff while stretching it, or gather the sleeve and use a zig-zag stitch to avoid losing any stretch.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    10. Attach the cuff to the sleeve lining the same way; however, since the other end of it is now attached to the outer layer, it takes some interesting maneuvering like you can see below.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    11. The waistband also attaches to the outer layer and lining. I recommend zig-zag stitching the inside of all the rib-knits to ensure that they stay folded perfectly in half and don't move around, skewing your jacket. Gather the back panel to keep some stretch in the waistband.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    12. Turn the jacket right-side out and sew in a reversible zipper to complete your new bomber!

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    What fabric combinations are you going to use for yours? I'd love to see some finished projects!

  • Silk-Cotton Statement Jacket

    We all know how important it is to have all the basic wardrobe staples right? A crisp white shirt, perfect fitting jeans, and a pair of nude pumps to name a few. So how do you keep these items rotating seamlessly season to season? By mixing in a great statement piece of course! I love a good abstract, geo, or in this case ikat print. So as soon as I saw this fabric, I knew it was perfect for what I wanted to create! Here's what I used- Fabric: Oscar de la Renta Pink/Wine Ikat Silk-Cotton Satin Lining: Chocolate Brown Heavy Twill Lining Simplicity Pattern: #8093 The only change I made in the pattern was to shorten the sleeve to 3/4 length.  This silk-cotton is so nice to work with. It has the perfect amount of stiffness to achieve a structured look,  yet it's so soft and comfortable to wear. Not only did I use the heavy twill to fully line the jacket, I also used it as contrast fabric on the sides. Oh and by the way, I know I'm not the only one who hordes scraps of fabric. So why not create a little self rosette applique like I did. You can either sew it right on to the jacket or make a pin! I was so pleased with the outcome! I LOVE my new jacket, and I have so many items in my closet that would look great with it! Mission accomplished! Enjoy!

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