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Fashion Sewing

  • Mood DIY: Button Size Chart

    Enjoy this free button size chart for all your DIY needs! Print it out and hang it in your own sewing studio, or keep it in your tool kit. What's your favorite type of button to work with? Tell us in the comments below!
  • Mood DIY: Eye Button Shirt Embellishment

    Need a new idea to make that button-up shirt you're working on just a little more eye-catching? This DIY can by sewists and crafters alike! Sewing up your own shirt is an added plus so you can size the placket a little wider than usual. However, if garment creation isn't your usual forte, you can get the same look with an old blouse, some new buttons, and a jar of fabric paint! Fabrics & materials used: If you're simply altering a shirt you already own, be sure to choose buttons to match the buttonholes that already exist. If you're making your shirt yourself, sew your buttonholes and attach your buttons before you start on the eyes. Once those are in place, button your shirt up. Using your temporary marking tool, sketch an almond shape so that it fits around the top and bottom of the button. Repeat for each button. I used the skinniest brush in the pack, with a small dot of paint to trace over the eyes with Jacquard Textile paint. If you've never used it before, it works absolute wonders. It moves with your fabric without stiffening it too much, goes on evenly, and is machine washable. I let my shirt dry for about 20 minutes and then it was all set to wear! Before this project, I had never thought about embellishing a shirt placket, but now I want to do it to everything! What other button embellishment ideas can you come up with?
  • Mood DIY: Free Flared Button Up Shirt Pattern

    Even if there's 2 feet of snow outside, I have my sights set on spring. I'm ready for floral prints and lighter fabrics, so today I got a jump start on a wardrobe for the new season. Mood's new silk charmeuses were perfect for this longline, flared button-up! The large-scale print suits the length of the blouse and the weight lends itself to a gorgeous drape. Fabrics & materials used: To keep the shirt light and draped, I opted against a lining. Because of this, French seams were a must in order to keep the silk from fraying. I began the shirt construction by attaching the front and back panels of the shirt at the sides and shoulders. Next, both front panels needed plackets for the buttons. Each one was interfaced and stitched onto the wrong side of the shirt itself, like you can see above. To avoid visible stitches on the front of the placket, I folded mine over and slip-stitched it into place. I added a single box pleat at the center back before attaching the collar the same way I attached the plackets.In this case, the collar was sewn to the right side of the shirt and slip-stitched on the wrong side. Since the shirt remained unlined, I finished the armholes with 1/4" binding that I made from the same silk as the rest of the blouse. I didn't want any buttons to be visible, so I hand sewed 8 snaps along the inside of the placket. This also omitted the need for buttonholes, which was an added bonus! This pattern is one of my favorites, since it can be altered so many ways - shortened, lengthened, made with a different fabric type entire, sleeves could be easily added. It's versatility is terrific. Are you going to be making any changes when you try it out?
  • Mood DIY: Free Cutout Dress Sewing Pattern

    Sporting bright green on St. Patrick's Day is certainly a fun tradition, but I've always been a fan of a more subtle look for the holiday. This easy to sew pattern features everything you'd want in a cute day-to-night look; flattering cutouts, a nice silhouette, and huge pockets! Plus, you can effortlessly dress it up with heels, or go for a more comfy and casual look with some flats. Fabrics & materials used:
    Dress Pattern Layout

    DOWNLOAD THE FREE PATTERN HERE

    Pattern pieces 1, 2, 4, and 5 make up your bodice. If you're working with a more translucent fabric, you may want to use a lining, but the jacquard I used was the perfect weight to skip one. Instead, I put the garment together with French seams.

    The skirt gets pleated twice in the front and twice in the back, lining up with the seams of the bodice. Each pleat should be about 2" deep.

    I made the pockets of mine rather large, so they overlap a bit in the front. If you're working with a bulkier fabric, you may want to make them slightly smaller.

    The back was finished with a 24" invisible zipper that I shortened to about 20". If you're unfamiliar with how to insert one, we have a tutorial here! Lastly, I finished off the sleeves, neckline and hem with simple rolled hems. This could be substituted with a full lining, facings, or bias tape! Which are you going to use?
  • Mood DIY: How to Draft a Bridal Robe Pattern

    Getting ready the morning of your wedding is stressful enough; with a minimum of ten thousand things to worry about, you may as well be comfortable! This gorgeous silk robe was easy to draft, and it only took an hour to put together, so you can check one thing off your To-Do List in just an afternoon! Fabrics & materials used: The robe is made up of three simple panels. I kept mine very rectangular to get the drop sleeve shape, but you could easily modify yours to the silhouette you'd prefer. The front is two pieces, each side should be the width of 1/4 your waist size. I then added three inches to each so the robe has a bit of flow. The same math was used for the back, but I placed it on the fold so it's all one piece. The panels are then sewn at the shoulders and up the sides, but be sure to leave a 12" space toward the top for sleeves. For my sleeves, used this gorgeous guipure lace. It has a nice weight and looks absolutely stunning. The length is entirely up to personal preference. This one is about a yard long, with 10" lace trim sewn around the hem and then top-stitched. The last detail is a simple 3" wide belt. I cut two strips along the width of my fabric, so my belt was ultimately about 3 yards long with a seam, in the center. The finished product is beautiful, comfortable, and feels totally luxurious. Will you be making your own? Which trim are you thinking about using?
  • Mood DIY: Free Microfleece Jacket Pattern

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    A wardrobe can never have too many jackets. They're versatile, and they can dress up or tone down an outfit with ease. For this one, I used one of Mood's new microfleeces and a bit of fashion-weight faux leather for the yoke and upper sleeves.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    I chose to line just the body of this jacket with more fleece. Lining the sleeves made it just a tad too bulky, and it's incredibly warm without a second layer anyway!

     Fleece Jacket Pattern - SMALL

    DOWNLOAD FREE PATTERN TEMPLATE HERE

    (Please note, this pattern does not include seam allowances!)

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    The sewing itself isn't too tricky. Simply attach the yoke to the bottom back panel and then at the shoulders of the front panels; next add the collar/lapel around the entire top of the garment. Repeat with the lining, but before attaching the two, I sewed on the sleeves.  While attaching the lining, right sides together, I left the armholes unsewn. When it came time to flip the jacket right-side out, I could do so through the arm holes. A bit of slip-stitching closed it up afterward!

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    The final step was to add a zipper (I had to shorten mine a bit), and top-stitch around the perimeter of the jacket, like you can see above.

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    Ultimately, it's a super cozy little jacket - great for casualwear or a light workout, and absolutely perfect for this cold weather that's been moving in on NYC.

    What color will you be making yours?

  • All About Skirt Silhouettes

    PREVIEW Just as there are plenty of dress shapes and silhouettes to choose from, skirts have their own line-up and applications, too! If it's your first time making a skirt or you're just looking for a reference to help research for your next project, we've got you covered!

    ALINEA-LINE

    An A-LINE design is a simple one that is fitted at the waist and gradually widens towards the hem of the skirt. With this design, it appears to have the shape of a capital letter “A.” The length of these skirts varies, but anywhere between mid-thigh and knee-height is common. It’s a flattering look for many body types and is easy to make, too! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Poplins, Brocades, and Tweeds!                

    BOXPLEATEDBOX-PLEATED

    The BOX-PLEATED skirt is a rather sophisticated look with its crisp folds and repeated pleats. The shape of the pleats can be maintained from the top to the bottom of the skirt, but this can vary, too, if you prefer the pleats to flow towards the hem of the skirt. The number and size of pleats across the skirt can be different too—big and small, a few to many! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Cottons, Silks, and Sateens!              

    TIEREDTIERED

    If you’re looking for a versatile style to work into your wardrobe, consider sewing yourself a tiered skirt! Tiered skirts are designed to highlight layers which are usually gathered to provide mobility and a slightly ruffled appearance. The layers can be either free-flowing or attached. Tiered skirts are a great opportunity for working with color-blocking, and changing the length of the tiers of your skirt can change your whole ensemble around! Click here for a look at a tiered skirt design we made here at Mood! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Jersey Knits, Crepes, and Viole!            

    MERMAIDMERMAID

    A MERMAID skirt is a more stylized design; the skirt is usually tight and fitted from the waist line to about the knee or lower before flouncing out. The flounce is usually long and asymmetrical and can even have a bit of a train behind the wearer. These skirts are often made using fabrics with good drape, since this is what likens the flounce to look like the end of a mermaid’s tail! These types of skirts are great for formal gatherings and ballroom occasions. We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Crepe Back Satins, Silks, and Dupioni!              

    TRUMPETTRUMPET

    TRUMPET skirts are similar to MERMAID skirts, but the flounce on the end of the sheathed part of the skirt is usually shorter and has an even hemline. Also, where MERMAID skirts tend to be longer or to-the-floor in length, TRUMPET skirt hemlines are usually above mid-calf length. Paired with a blouse or a dress shirt, TRUMPET skirts can be great business-casual wear! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Satins, Suitings, and Sateens!                

    PENCILPENCIL

    PENCIL skirts are classy and stylish! They’re wonderful office wear or for when you want to meet up with friends. A PENCIL skirt is designed to have a straight shape that skims close to your silhouette without being too constricting. Depending on what you pair with it, pencil skirts can look really sharp! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Suitings, Sateens, and Wool!                

    BODYCONBODYCON

    BODYCON skirts are the most fitted design available. They are fitted tighter than PENCIL skirts and are usually made with fabric that stretches to ensure mobility. BODYCON skirts emphasize a fitted lower silhouette, so they’re often paired with a loose, flowing top or one that shows off one’s midriff! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Neoprenes, Jersey Knits, and Ponte.            

    TULIPTULIP

    TULIP skirts are a beautiful and elegant design. Their hemline scoops down a bit towards the bottom and overlaps once in the front to give the appearance of tulip petals folded over each other. This design is sometimes coupled with pleats at the waist to provide drape and flow. This type of skirt is another great option for office wear or for those days where you want to dress up an extra bit! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Silk Georgette, Ponte, and Silk Charmeuse!              

    WRAPWRAP

    Like the TULIP skirt, a WRAP skirt overlaps once in the front, but where the TULIP hemline is a little more consistent in design, WRAP skirt hemline is usually a bit more freeform. You’ll find anything from asymmetrical designs to even hemlines, and many even have ties that wrap around to the front, too. We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Pique, Silks, and Suitings!                  

    HANDKERCHIEFHANDKERCHIEF

    HANDKERCHIEF skirts are an earthy type of skirt design that slightly resemble TIERED skirts; these skirts utilize the tiers, but they boast a triangular shape that juts loose and easy down from the waistline. They also highlight the use of many layers with thin fabric for a free-flowing skirt style that won’t risk a see-through mishap! This skirt style is very feminine and is great for casual outings. We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Poplin, Silk Chiffon, and Silk Georgette!                

    HILOWHI-LOW

    HI-LOW skirts are gorgeous and chic. Their design doesn’t stray much, as its focus is on the difference of height between the front of its skirt hem and the back. The back of the hemline is always longer than the front which usually falls around mid-thigh. While flowing fabrics are common for this skirt design, stiffer fabrics like brocades are an option, too! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Brocades, Crepe Back Satin, and 4-Ply Crepe Silk!                

    SARONGSARONG

    SARONG skirts are a style that’s most popular as beach attire! Usually made of loose and unrestricting fabrics, these skirts are comfortable and perfect for lounging and having a good time. They’re like WRAP dresses, though SARONG dresses are usually accent with a flourish at the side, usually starting at the hipline. SARONG skirts are safest as casual-wear—comfort is their top priority! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Jersey Knit, 4-Ply Crepe Silk, and Poplin!              

    MINIMINI

    The MINI skirt—one of the three basic skirt designs, and the shortest! MINI skirts are popular designs for making with circle skirt patterns. They fall between mid-thigh and knee height and their panels can be gathered or flat. The choice is yours! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Pique, Denim, and Suede!                  

    MIDIMIDI

    A MIDI skirt is the second of the three basic skirt designs. Put simply, a MIDI is a skirt whose hemline falls around knee-height on the wearer. These, too, can be pleated or flat in design, so long as the length is maintained. Where MINI skirts often hug the wearer’s frame a bit closer (like an A-LINE), MIDI skirts look great with a gradual flare to a wider hem. Take advantage of a circle skirt pattern for this one! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Satin, Suiting, and Eyelet!              

    MAXIMAXI

    And finally, we have the MAXI skirt! MAXIs are a long style of skirt that ranges from comfy to fashionable! You’ll often find these made of jersey and other stretch knits, but don’t be fooled! MAXI skirts go beautifully with stiffer fabrics like tweeds and sateens, and they’re great for every season! Don’t be afraid to pair a light MAXI with a midriff tank or a heavy one with a turtle neck. This style is versatile and comfortable, so take advantage of it! We’d suggest these fabrics if you’re looking to make a skirt with this design: Tweeds, Sateens, and Jersey Knits!                 These are the more common skirt designs and silhouettes, but we tried to cover a wide range to help you get started! Which of these is your favorite style? What style will you make for your next project?  
  • Mood DIY: Paneled Workout Leggings

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    The holidays are over, which means everyone is now scrambling to get healthy and work off all that feasting they did last week! Rather than go shopping and buy a whole workout outfit, why not make your own yoga pants? They can be customized to fit your exact style and body type, so they'll be the comfiest pants you own!

    Fabrics & materials used:

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    This project probably took about 30 minutes, start to finish, so if you're looking for an easy DIY to start off the new year, this one is absolutely perfect.

    To draft the pattern, I followed this sew-along that another blogger did this summer. To make them a little more sporty, I added the mesh panel to the bottom of each leg, which you can see above!

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    Once I drew up my pattern, all I needed to do was cut out the shape I wanted at the bottom. Since the mesh had a slightly tighter stretch than the jersey, I widened the mesh panels just slightly.

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    Since I don't have a serger, a zig-zag stitch did the trick just fine! I also added a 3" waistband to the top, skipping the elastic inside since the compression jersey stayed up fine without it. The selvedge of the mesh also looked pretty interesting so I chose to leave the leg bottoms unfinished.

    Are you going to be trying your own leggings? Which fabrics are you going to use?

  • Floral brocade statement coat

    It dawned on me the only redeeming quality winter has is the ability to allow me to wear coats everyday. So I take full advantage at least once a week adding a new coat to my wardrobe. When I ordered this floral brocade, the last thing on my mind was a coat.  I envisioned a skirt or maybe even a dress but when it arrived, it arrived along with this green silk wool and laying next to each other screamed coat to me and here we have it.  I lined it with this green bemberg viscose. Because it's such a busy fabric I knew I wanted a pattern that was simple which brought me back to this Burdastyle 11/2013 #116 pattern with the following pattern alterations: -Added 7" to the collar -Cut the sleeve 7" from the bottom for the top half of the sleeve and added 5" to the length with the green wool fabric -Removed 3.5" from the bottom of the front pattern These leather pants were previously made here along with this silk shirt dress worn as a top. mood floral-brocade-statement2 floral-brocade-statement-coat3   floral-brocade-statement-coat4 floral-brocade-statement-coat5 floral-brocade-statement-coat6 floral-brocade-statement-coat7 floral-brocade-atatement-coat8
  • Holiday Style | "Velour Jumpsuit"

    The festive holiday season is quickly approaching. Now is the time to start thinking about pulling together all your fabulous looks! Here's a great style idea for all you busy moms, or anyone who's looking for a hassle-free look. Combining comfort and style has become one of my top priorities. Being a busy wife, and full-time mommy of two, can be very stressful around the holiday seasons- especially when trying to get everyone dressed! I thought to myself, "How cute and easy would it be to make a one-piece velour jumper?" Perfect actually! I can get everyone dressed and still have time for me! Here's how I made this quick and easy pull-on velour jumper! Seriously it only took me an hour and a half to sew!! What I used: Vogue Pattern V9160 option B- removed pockets, and zipper. Fabric: Apple Butter Stretch Rayon Velour I went for the more "relaxed" fit so I removed the zipper and pockets. I am able to pull it on and off very easily! The velour is very soft and has plenty of stretch. This Apple Butter color is perfect for the holidays! You have to check out all the beautiful color options available on moodfabrics.com Enjoy!!  

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    velour jump1

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