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Free Patterns

  • Mood DIY: Free Flared Button Up Shirt Pattern

    Even if there's 2 feet of snow outside, I have my sights set on spring. I'm ready for floral prints and lighter fabrics, so today I got a jump start on a wardrobe for the new season. Mood's new silk charmeuses were perfect for this longline, flared button-up! The large-scale print suits the length of the blouse and the weight lends itself to a gorgeous drape. Fabrics & materials used: To keep the shirt light and draped, I opted against a lining. Because of this, French seams were a must in order to keep the silk from fraying. I began the shirt construction by attaching the front and back panels of the shirt at the sides and shoulders. Next, both front panels needed plackets for the buttons. Each one was interfaced and stitched onto the wrong side of the shirt itself, like you can see above. To avoid visible stitches on the front of the placket, I folded mine over and slip-stitched it into place. I added a single box pleat at the center back before attaching the collar the same way I attached the plackets.In this case, the collar was sewn to the right side of the shirt and slip-stitched on the wrong side. Since the shirt remained unlined, I finished the armholes with 1/4" binding that I made from the same silk as the rest of the blouse. I didn't want any buttons to be visible, so I hand sewed 8 snaps along the inside of the placket. This also omitted the need for buttonholes, which was an added bonus! This pattern is one of my favorites, since it can be altered so many ways - shortened, lengthened, made with a different fabric type entire, sleeves could be easily added. It's versatility is terrific. Are you going to be making any changes when you try it out?
  • Mood DIY: Free Cutout Dress Sewing Pattern

    Sporting bright green on St. Patrick's Day is certainly a fun tradition, but I've always been a fan of a more subtle look for the holiday. This easy to sew pattern features everything you'd want in a cute day-to-night look; flattering cutouts, a nice silhouette, and huge pockets! Plus, you can effortlessly dress it up with heels, or go for a more comfy and casual look with some flats. Fabrics & materials used:
    Dress Pattern Layout

    DOWNLOAD THE FREE PATTERN HERE

    Pattern pieces 1, 2, 4, and 5 make up your bodice. If you're working with a more translucent fabric, you may want to use a lining, but the jacquard I used was the perfect weight to skip one. Instead, I put the garment together with French seams.

    The skirt gets pleated twice in the front and twice in the back, lining up with the seams of the bodice. Each pleat should be about 2" deep.

    I made the pockets of mine rather large, so they overlap a bit in the front. If you're working with a bulkier fabric, you may want to make them slightly smaller.

    The back was finished with a 24" invisible zipper that I shortened to about 20". If you're unfamiliar with how to insert one, we have a tutorial here! Lastly, I finished off the sleeves, neckline and hem with simple rolled hems. This could be substituted with a full lining, facings, or bias tape! Which are you going to use?
  • Mood DIY: Free Two-Piece Prom Dress Pattern

     

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    Your prom should be anything but ordinary. It's one of the most anticipated events of one's high school career, so why settle for just another dress off the rack? Making your own means it will be exactly what you want, with the added bonus of being one of a kind!

    Fabric & materials used:

    To find some inspiration, I looked at recent bridal and couture lines to see what shapes and colors were trending. Separates kept appearing, and understandably so; the crop top/midi skirt combo looks flattering on many body types and it's a great way to modernize an otherwise modest silhouette. Another common factor was deep wine tones, and I couldn't be more in love. Dark reds are my absolute favorite shades and they look good with so many different skin tones, which is an awesome plus.

    Shape & Color

    The bodice I went with was actually made from the pattern in my last DIY post! You can find out how to make it there, and you can download the PDF pattern here!

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    I made just two alterations: the bottom was tapered slightly, and I made a mock neck instead of a ruffle collar. If you've never made one, trace a french curve for about 7-8 inches, move it to the right 2 inches and trace it again so you have 2 parallel curves. Place the more curved end on the fold, like so:

    Collar

    To bring a little dimension into the gown, I opted to use this gorgeous guipure lace. It's the perfect overlay for skirts and bodices alike, and the floral makes the dress a little more Spring.

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    The skirt was the easiest part of the whole project. It's just a basic half circle skirt, so anyone can make it! It's even hemmed with some Stitch Witchery to avoid ugly hem stitching.

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    If you're not familiar with half circle skirts, I can walk you through it quite easily!

    1. You'll need to find your radius length. Measure your waist and divide it by 3.14. So if you have a 30" waist, your radius will be 9.5".

    2. Choose how long you'll want your skirt and add 2" for the hem. Keep in mind you'll probably be wearing heels! I made mine 45", hem included.

    Skirt

    3. Now you can start laying out your fabric. Fold it in half, lengthwise, and mark out your radius from one of the folded corners.

    4. From your radius, measure out the length of your skirt along the fold and selvedge, as well as a few points in between so you can connect the dots to form curves.

    5. Cut out your fabric, and sew up the selvedge to create the perfect skirt! You can also add a waistband if you so choose, and an invisible zipper.

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    Since I chose to use a poly satin (which looks, feels, and drapes beautifully!), it kept the cost down considerably; and for just an afternoon of work, sewing a prom dress is a great alternative to buying one at the store. The possibilities are totally endless though! You can choose your own color, overlay, skirt length, and more! You could even go with a silk to make the look even more luxe! Are you going to try your own?

  • Mood DIY: Free Beaded Crop Top Sewing Pattern

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    You might hear 'crop top' and think of slouchy tees or cutoff tanks, but it's not difficult to put a sophisticated spin on them. The crop trend has made its way to the forefront these last couple years, and for good reason. They can be easily dressed up or down, with a midi skirt or high-waisted pants, and they leave the door open for some great accessorizing. For today's DIY and free pattern, we'll be adding some beads into the mix.

    Fabric & materials used:

    Beaded Crop Top Pattern Layout

    DOWNLOAD FREE CROP TOP PATTERN HERE

    I lined the shirt in the same fabric as the outside, although this was just personal preference; I knew I was looking for a crisp, sleek look.

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    Since the entire shirt is only made up of a few panels, it goes together fairly easily and is very simple to alter if need be. For example, the front is comprised of a middle panel and two sides. I added two bust darts to reduce a little fabric at the armholes. Other alterations could include tapering the bottom a bit to be more form fitting.

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    The back panels go together similarly, and attach to the front at the shoulders and sides. The collar gets folded downward, in half, and attached to the neckline with 1" knife pleats. I made each side go in opposite directions so they meet in the middle with a box pleat.

    This is also the point where you can attach your lining. Once the collar is pinned or stay-stitched in place, place the lining over it so it's sandwiched between the lining and the outer fabric. The armholes and base can also be stitched closed.

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    For the trim, I kept it simple and only added it to the neckline and hem, however this is where you can truly get creative! Create swirling designs or even add some trim along the seams. Be sure to tie off the ends of the trim though, to avoid losing beads and sequins!

    DSC_0969What alterations would you make to this pattern? Would yours be more tapered or have different trim? Tell me your ideas below! DSC_0986

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