We’ve made significant improvements to Moodfabrics.com. We hope you like them. If you find any issues please Click Here to report them.


Tops

  • Mood DIY: Free Microfleece Jacket Pattern

    DSC_0485a

    A wardrobe can never have too many jackets. They're versatile, and they can dress up or tone down an outfit with ease. For this one, I used one of Mood's new microfleeces and a bit of fashion-weight faux leather for the yoke and upper sleeves.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    I chose to line just the body of this jacket with more fleece. Lining the sleeves made it just a tad too bulky, and it's incredibly warm without a second layer anyway!

     Fleece Jacket Pattern - SMALL

    DOWNLOAD FREE PATTERN TEMPLATE HERE

    (Please note, this pattern does not include seam allowances!)

    DSC_0497

    The sewing itself isn't too tricky. Simply attach the yoke to the bottom back panel and then at the shoulders of the front panels; next add the collar/lapel around the entire top of the garment. Repeat with the lining, but before attaching the two, I sewed on the sleeves.  While attaching the lining, right sides together, I left the armholes unsewn. When it came time to flip the jacket right-side out, I could do so through the arm holes. A bit of slip-stitching closed it up afterward!

    DSC_0492

    The final step was to add a zipper (I had to shorten mine a bit), and top-stitch around the perimeter of the jacket, like you can see above.

    DSC_0504DSC_0487

    Ultimately, it's a super cozy little jacket - great for casualwear or a light workout, and absolutely perfect for this cold weather that's been moving in on NYC.

    What color will you be making yours?

  • Trend Report: 2016 Recap

    We're in the thick of winter, and that means it's time to layer and bundle up! This coming year's styles play with thinner and thicker fabrics, which lets you bundle up with layers or go big with one huge and independent style. From trench coats to tiered designs, long pieces are the highlight of this coming year, so make sure to stock up!

    Long Coats

    David Michael | Spring Ready-to-Wear 2017 David Michael | Spring Ready-to-Wear 2017
    Carry your trench coat style over to the next season! Lots of designers fashioned this look out of thinner fabrics to make wearing light and easy with the coming warm weather--long enough to shield against the wind and light enough to keep from overheating.

    For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!:

    Slit Skirt Dresses

    Michael Kors Collection | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Michael Kors Collection | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Slit skirts and dresses are a sophisticated style that look great on both long and shorter skirts. They make your silhouette look long and lean and can be paired with a number of skirt shapes from pencil to empire styles! Longer skirts are better for formal settings, but a shorter skirt like the one above can work in a more casual setting.
    Nicole Millder | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Nicole Miller | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Slit style skirts are also a great opportunity for showing off a pair of your favorite shoes. With the exposed look from the slit, attention is drawn to the legs and feet and giving the chance to highlight great footwear! Don't be afraid to use a busy pattern either. Find the right pattern and it can make your design really stunning.
    Tome | Spring 2017 Resort Tome | Spring 2017 Resort
    For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!:

    Coat Dresses

    Giamba | Spring 2017 Resort Giamba | Spring 2017 Resort
    More coat styles! Lots of styles were spruced up in sportswear with coat dresses. Their bulky design can be a blessing in this chilly weather, but it's also good for transition weather like in the spring.
    Victor Alfaro | Spring 2017 Resort Victor Alfaro | Spring 2017 Resort
    Paired with pants or leggings and this is great for cooler weather, or you can sport it in mild temperatures, too! It's another pretty adaptable look.
    T by Alexander Wang | Spring 2017 Resort T by Alexander Wang | Spring 2017 Resort
    For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!:

    Plunge Neckline

    A popular look from the 2017 line-up included both reserved and daring plunge necklines. From mock to true designs, we've seen potential in plunge necklines for the coming year!
    Kate Spada New York | Spring 2017 Resort Kate Spada New York | Spring 2017 Resort
    Lots of formal styles with this neckline are usually left open, but don't be afraid to adapt the style to the season and wear a shirt underneath to cover up and keep warm! Use a neutral or skin tone underneath and you won't have to worry about taking away any emphasis from the plunge's design.
    Tome | Spring 2017 Resort Tome | Spring 2017 Resort
    For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!:

    Ruffles

    Strutting fancy and elegant, ruffles were accented everywhere from sleeves to collars. Loose and flowing like the ones below, these shorter ruffles bring an air of femininity to any look!
    Kate Spade New York | Spring 2017 Resort Kate Spade New York | Spring 2017 Resort
    Sea | Spring 2017 Resort Sea | Spring 2017 Resort
    Tome | Spring 2017 Resort Tome | Spring 2017 Resort
    For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!:

    Tiered Pieces

    Both tops and bottoms showcased tiers incorporated into their designs. We saw this style experimented with last year towards the fall and winter seasons, but now they’re starting to really blossom from these designers!
    Roksanda | Spring 2017 Resort Roksanda | Spring 2017 Resort
    Gathered sections and color blocking can be used to accent and project a tiered look for pieces, so don’t be afraid to take advantage of these styles. Both look wonderful!
    See by Chloe | Spring 2017 Resort See by Chloe | Spring 2017 Resort
    For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!:

    Asymmetry

    Rag & Bone | Spring 2017 Resort 2017 Rag & Bone | Spring 2017 Resort 2017
    Have you ever donned an asymmetrical look? These designs can be quite refreshing from your usual balanced styles, so if you haven’t tried one yet, consider a dress with an asymmetric neckline or top with mismatched sleeves.
    Vionnet | Spring 2017 Resort Vionnet | Spring 2017 Resort
    A one-sided accent or flourished hemline can also be a great way to make a piece asymmetrical. It doesn’t need to be too big or loud—sometimes smaller details speak large volumes for fashion. For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!:

    Women in Menswear

    Women in menswear has been popular for decades, and it’s always nice to see men’s recent designs applied to women’s fashion, too. Below we have this past fall’s cropped pants style paired with a fitted blazer for a sharp and masculine women’s suit. The tapered hemline of the pants narrows your silhouette for a fantastic business style.
    3.1 Phillip Lim | Spring 2017 Resort 3.1 Phillip Lim | Spring 2017 Resort
    And if looser pants are more your game, try a loose trouser with a fitted jacket. The contrast between the waistline and the trouser will slim the appearance of your waist and give your bottom half a weighted appeal!
    Celine | Spring 2017 Resort Celine | Spring 2017 Resort
    For some fabric inspirations for these styles, try these!: And that's the forecast for now! What highlights are your favorites? Are you looking forward to adding any of these styles into your wardrobe?
  • Mood DIY: Hooded Bell Sleeve Fur Jacket w/ Free Sewing Template

    IMG_1899a

    The fur jacket trend doesn't seem to be fading as autumn slowly turns to winter, and honestly I can't complain. With all of Mood's new faux furs hitting the site, I've been dying to work with more of them.

    My first venture into faux fur sewing was just a couple months ago, with a long vest you can find right here (I also explain the best way to cut and sew with fur!). For this project, I made the body of the jacket almost the exact same way, however I chose to crop it to just 18". Then, of course, came the sleeves and hood.

    To save you some work, I drew up a template of the hood I made. It's big and cozy, and should fit most adults! Below, I'll be explaining an easy way to draft a bell sleeve pattern.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    Hood Template Layout DOWNLOAD HOOD TEMPLATE HERE

    If you've never drafted a sleeve before, it's easiest to alter a sleeve pattern that you already know fits. For this one, I took a pattern piece from a button up shirt. Since, it's from something more form fitting than a jacket, I thought I might need to change up the top as well, but after measuring the curve and the arm hole of my jacket, I discovered they were both the same length - perfect!

    IMG_1914

    Next, I needed to create the bell shape. I began by cutting 5 evenly spaced, straight lines from the bottom of the sleeve until about 1/4" from the top.

    IMG_1915

    Each was then spaced out until I had the desired length at the bottom of the bell. Between the center two strips, I left two inches, then 3" and 5" respectively going outward.

    IMG_1916a

    The sleeve should be symmetrical, so I did the same measurements on both sides.

    IMG_1917

    Lastly, I just needed to trace and connect the dots. The top and sides are very similar to the original sleeve, but the bottom now creates a slight curve!

    IMG_1918

    Once all the pattern pieces are drafted, they go together pretty easily. The actual sewing of the jacket probably only took an hour. The side hood panels go on either side of the rectangular strip and the whole thing attaches at the neckline of the jacket.

    IMG_1883

    The lining pieces are the same, so they get sewn together similarly. To attach the lining to the fur, I sewed it right-sides together, leaving a small opening along the bottom back to put it right-side out. A quick slip-stitch closed it up!

    IMG_1873

    IMG_1855

  • Mood DIY: African Print Peplum Shirt

    IMG_1569a

    The weather in NYC is impossible to predict, it seems. The sunny, 70 degree Friday afternoon when I made this shirt has since given way to ice rain as I write this. Boo!

    Luckily, peplums never seem to go out of season! Layering is key in the fall and winter, particularly around the holidays when you could find yourself sweltering next to a fireplace.

    Fabrics & materials needed:

    The McCall's dress pattern is listed as optional because any bodice pattern with princess seams will do the trick! For my shirt, I cut out View C (with no center seam) just down to the waistline. For the peplum, I essentially made a tiny circle skirt with the template below.

    circle skirt

    If you've never made a circle skirt before, fold your fabric in half along the weft and then again along the warp. One of your corners should have folds on either side, place that one at the top left.

    From that same corner, you should cut a small circle with an equal radius all the way around. To find yours, divide your waist size by 2(3.14). For example, a 31" waist will require a 5" radius.

    Once your radius is measured and marked, you can draw the bottom curve of your "skirt". Since it's just a peplum, I made my desired length about 10" from the radius.

    IMG_1537

    Once everything was cut, it was time to pin!

    Rather than sew the shirt together normally, I chose to add some bias tape in between the seams. This gave the shirt an even more graphic feel, and also hid things a little better if the fabric design didn't line up perfectly. (Matching just doesn't seem to get easier!)

    IMG_1538

    To keep some of the bulk down, and to use the least amount possible, I cut the bias tape down the middle. It was then placed between each seam, with the exception of the shoulders.

    IMG_1541

    Once it was pinned between the fabric, it went through the machine normally with a 1/2" seam allowance.

    IMG_1545

    The peplum was added last and the remaining raw edges were bound with the folded bias tape.

    IMG_1572a

    Finished, it's a fun and bouncy top that can be worn and styled for a plethora of occasions. Plus, it can be made out of so many different fabric types! What are you going to make yours with?

    IMG_1578a

    IMG_1581a

  • Zodiac Gift Guide

    Zodiac sign readings and horoscopes might not always be completely accurate, but they can be fun to look up and share with others! They give little insights to the type of person you might feel you are, or they might just give you another perspective to see things from that you hadn't thought of before. A fresh look is always exciting, so we wanted to put together a kind of fabric horoscope that would do this for everyone to try! Combined with DIYs and other sources of inspiration linked for your convenience, we've tried to narrow down and tailor a fabric and design for each Zodiac Sign that could help you find a style choice for yourself, or even for a friend or loved one as a gift! Take a look below and see which of our sign designs you like best! No one is made up of a single Zodiac sign, so don't be surprised if you find yourself loving more than one! There are only positive vibes in these designs--have fun with it!

    Aries: Sequins, high energy, and bright colors!

    Aries signs are usually know for being very self-motivated and passionate, and that energy should shine out! We think sequins fit them for this purpose! Sequins glitter in any light and make a statement the moment they're seen, which can be a great asset. Take a look at our latest stock of sequin fabrics and trims here! Bright colors would fit this sign as well. If sequins aren't your thing, a bright, strong color can be just as effective for showing off that confident personality. Consider this DIY, especially if you're iffy on sporting a sequin piece! There's no shame in going for a more mature or muted design. You can look just as fierce in this style!

    And with all that energy to use, plenty of you probably try to keep up with a daily workout plan! (If you don't already, consider trying it out for fun!) This phone case armband DIY will make it easy to keep in touch during your workouts or to carry your music with you. Music can make a world of difference during a workout and can be a great motivator for both pros and novices!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Milan Fashion Week | Spring 2017

    .

    Taurus: Tweeds, stable but comforting and warm!

    Taurus is known for being a sturdy sign where comfort and stability are key! A warm skirt or jacket made of tweed will last forever if you take good care of it (and Taurus signs will!) and they'll look professional. The muted colors tweeds usually come in will also give off a mature appearance. Take a look at our latest stock of tweed fabrics here! Consider this color-block wool skirt DIY if you have little experience with working with tweeds! Practical and comfortably conservative, this skirt is easy to assemble and will maintain a long lifespan with you!

    And when you're ready to bundle up at home and take that time for yourself, consider doing so with this handy reading pillow! Fashioned with multiple pockets for storing writing and/reading materials, this pillow project is great at multi-tasking as it is at relaxing! (Plus it's super cute!)

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Fall 2016 Office Fashion and Styles

    .

    Gemini: Brocades, versatile, and creative!

    Geminis have a lot going on in their heads creatively, and fashion is a great medium to express that through! Fabrics that are organized with a lot of detail are great for this purpose! Some might think these styles are too "busy," but when crafted carefully (and with your natural expertise!) into your style, they can look stunning! Brocades are perfect for this! Fabrics with duality are also appealing for these signs, because it allows them to switch up the style without having to find a new piece! Take a look at our latest stock of brocade fabrics here! Consider this bomber jacket DIY for a versatile design that can keep up with your need for something refreshing! Reversible and beautiful, a brocade bomber jacket will be just the thing you've been looking to add to your wardrobe!

    Another hidden gem to add to your accessory collection is a cord and chain bracelet! Though small in size, a bright and colorful piece of jeweley can bring your entire look together!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: New York Fashion Week Trend Report | Fall 2016

    .

    Cancer: Performance Fabrics, energetic, and positive!

    Cancer signs are sensitive to the energy and emotions around them, and that sensitivity comes out best through positive interaction and activities! Hobbies like dancing and working out are natural outlets for you, which is why performance fabrics are a great fit! The more the fabric and outfit flows, the better, and it'll follow with you as you dance your way through your day. Take a look at our latest stock of performance fabrics here! Athletic and charismatic, Cancer signs feel best when they're sharing their excitement and energy with others, making you one of the best influences on the people around you. Solid, bright colors are good, but a print will help you reach out well, too! Consider this DIY for a flowing skirt and matching crop top that won't restrict your blinding and sweet personality! Continue sharing your positive outlook and it will come back to you!

    This adorable watermelon purse will bring an extra slice of energy to your wardrobe! With its shine and bright colors, just looking at it will lift your spirits!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: New York Fashion Week | Spring 2017

    .

    Leo: Faux furs, intelligent, and warm tones!

    Strong and confident are the usual qualities of this sign's focus, but they're more than just a proud face! Their intelligence is what makes them so strong-minded, and their confidence is what drives their action-oriented personalities. But for all their motivation , they can also be reserved and quiet in their personalities, eager to be there for others. Faux fur is show-stopping and needs a wearer who's bold enough to wear such a fabric confidently! Combined with warm tones, this fabric's style shows off the inviting personalities of Leos. Take a look at our latest stock of faux fur fabrics here! Consider this DIY for a simple but powerful faux fur vest piece! It's a stylish garment that will make you look and feel like a rock star that the world is waiting to see.

     What better way to show off your intelligent disposition than with a neck tie or bow tie? Try this DIY with a paisley fabric to add a more familiar or personable touch to your image!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Brocades on the Runway .

    Virgo: Viscose, reliable, and modest!

    Virgo signs are loyal and positively analytical, making them reliable and dependable friends! Their desire to be prepared fuels this reliable quality, and while they prioritize being ready for most situations, they see this as merely a logical way to live. This makes them a fairly modest and admirable people. Viscose fabrics are both comfortable and adaptable, which fits Virgo signs well! Viscose has great stretch so it can conform and flow when needed, and its subtle sheen makes it a beautiful addition for many designs! Take a look at our latest stock of  viscose fabrics here! Consider this t-shirt dress DIY for a cute and comfy look to make with your favorite Viscose fabrics!

    And for all the modest and reserved design one might think of along with a Virgo, shake it up with an accessory that stands out! Design your own faux fur pompom key-chain and show off to the world that you may be dependable, but you don't mind spoiling yourself from time-to-time, too (which is good!).

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Fall Pantone Forecast

    .

    Libra: Velvets, balanced fabrics, and soft textures!

    Libra signs are probably the softest and most cooperative sign, generally speaking, and they're good at being around other people (because they love to be around them!). They are a very balanced sign in that they can get along with most kind and good-natured people easily, making them very pleasant company. A nice Lyons velvet or stretch velvet could be great for this sign! The colors that velvet comes in are usually easy on the eyes, which is pleasing to both the wearer and passersby. Velvets are also soft, which would be comfortable to the gentle minds of the Libra sign. Take a look at our latest stock of  velvet fabrics here! Consider making a velvet dress with this DIY! This dress has a lovely flare and a tapered fit that's perfect for the fall season.

    For a little bit more flare, add an accessory like these tassel earrings! Another simple assembly project, these earrings will jump your ensemble up from casual to dazzling!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Paris Fashion Week | Spring 2017

    .

    Scorpio: Leathers, resourceful, and wise!

    Scorpios are a brilliant sign known for being the truest of friends, and their passion for others makes them resourceful and assertive when they need to protect others. They are wise with their loyalty and honest in all their efforts. Truth can be a big deal to them. This is why leather fabrics fit them so well! Leathers are worn and beautiful, and they're strength makes them durable and long-lasting. Take a look at our latest stock of  leather and faux leather fabrics here! For a brave and confident sign like this, a style has to match to them! We think this bomber jacket with a twist DIY would be perfect for Scorpio, because it takes a bold and confident person to both create and pull off this style! Scorpios who are confident about strutting through in a jacket like this will look fantastic!

    Don't think we've forgotten about the leather! A hand-crafted bag like this messenger bag/backpack combination DIY is what a Leo might be looking for! Multi-styled accessories like this are hard to come by, just like true friends!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Satin Draping

    .

    Sagittarius: Guipure Lace, a extroverted, and enthusiastic!

    A wandering soul with a heart for exploring, Sagittarius signs enjoy their freedom! This sign is very extroverted and loves engaging with people and the outside world, and being dressed for it is important! Things like statement pieces and conversation starters are perfect for this sign. Other great pieces are ornate fabrics for going out to socialize, like guipure lace! With scalloped edges and geometric designs, these intricate fabrics are gorgeous and stand out in a crowd. This complex design will reflect this sign's complex and interesting personality! Take a look at our latest stock of  guipure lace fabrics here! Consider trying this Lace Kimono DIY for a quick and easy garment that looks beautiful and stunning!

    And to mix it up a bit, try dressing up a simple shirt or dress collar with a hand-made removable collar! These are a lovely way to play up your look without making any permanent alterations to your clothing--no strings attached!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Abstract Prints

    .

    Capricorn: Cotton prints, honest, and rational!

    Capricorn signs are wonderful people who should be valued for their directness and honesty! Interacting with people like this is easy, because you never have to second guess what they're thinking--they'll tell you themselves! Their presence can be comforting in that way, and they'll always help in the most rational way they can see themselves. Their truthful efforts make them responsible and capable people, and their self-control is admirable. A fabric like cotton--tried, traditional, and true--is a perfect fit for this sign! Sport a cotton print to add a little style without having to put in too much extra effort (though they'll appreciate the extra effort, too!). Take a look at our latest stock of cotton prints fabrics here! Consider this plaid flannel shirt DIY to make for yourself or someone you know! Flannel and cotton shirts are pieces that can look incredible when their corners are crisp and their designs are sleek. Take the time to carefully put together a shirt like this, and this sign will be thoroughly impressed to hear you made it yourself!

    While a bolder print may not be your thing, changing up your style or combining it with one that your comfortable with can be refreshing! Try making yourself a pair of these custom fit leggings for a chic and comfortable style!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: NYFW Fall Forecast | Spring 2017 .

    Aquarius: Silk Charmeuse, innovative, and elegant!

    Aquarians are often noted for their attention to detail and their never-ending effort to improve, even when others think they're already at their best! This is because they constantly have new ideas that they think their project would look better with, and they don't mind getting their hands a little dirty to do it. Hard work always pays off for this sign! But for all their readiness to do the hard labor, they'll appreciate looking good, too, because they're good enough to balance both! A beautiful silk charmeuse  fits this sign. There's nothing better than someone who can do hard work and look elegant doing it! Take a look at our latest stock of silk charmeuse fabrics here! Consider trying out this ribbon tie blouse DIY made with silk charmeuse! It's a cute and dainty style, but that doesn't meant you can't get down to business and be taken seriously wearing it! Show them how it's done!

    Consider this velvet choker DIY for making an every-day accessory that's subtle yet stylish. Hold your head high knowing you've got the right ideas to take on your day!

    featuredimage

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Cotton Eyelets .

    Pisces: Silk Chiffons, artistic, and sophisticated!

    Truly a child of the arts, Pisces signs may thrive best through a creative outlet that lets them express emotions and their naturally intuitive thoughts! Clothing designs and styles that are too stiff or modern may seem boring, so look for or create your own patterns that help you feel right in your own skin. Ornate sleeves or decorative trims paired with smooth and shiny fabrics might fit your tastes better than others! A silk chiffon could be your perfect go-to fabric for this. These flow beautifully, feel smooth, and look like they're from a different time.  Take a look at our latest stock of silk chiffon fabrics here! Consider this buttoned sleeve shirt DIY that uses silk chiffon for a style that will make you feel both modern and elegant!

    For an accessory that incorporates aspects of nature or flowers, try making this fabric floral crown DIY! This is another cute and elegant piece to share!

     

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: London Fashion Week | Spring 2017

  • All About Necklines

    Necklines_Graphic_Copy Variety and fashion go hand-in-hand, and that applies to necklines, too! Necklines are a great piece to play and experiment with for designing tops. You can go for function and practicality or focus on style and appearance--any everything in between! Necklines are one of the most defining features of a top, which is why they're so great to work with, and you can use them to make a huge statement for your ensemble.

    We've collected together some of the most popular and common necklines styles and drawn up examples to compare and contrast below. Take a look and share your thoughts on your favorite designs with us!

    .

    .

    SCOOP2SCOOP NECKLINE

    A very common neckline, especially with store-brands. Circular in shape and has a flat collar that rests close to or on the clavicle. You could consider it one of the basic types of necklines, because it’s basically a neckline without a defined collar. This type of neckline can be great with almost any fabric, but is often found on knit shirts.          

    VNECK2V-NECK NECKLINE

    Another common neckline where the front half of the collar is angled down the center to form V-shape. It, too, is a common store-brand-type neckline and is usually a dressier design that the SCOOP NECKLINE. These can be made in many types of fabrics, but it’s especially good at keeping its shape in structured fabrics. The appearance is crisp and clean, making it very appealing and sharp!        

    UNECK2U-NECK NECKLINE

    A neckline that drops a little lower than a SCOOP or V-NECK NECKLINE and is basically a wider version of a SCOOP NECKLINE. It rests below the clavicle and is great for accentuating the chest. Because of the open space over the chest, these necklines are great for showing off necklaces as a statement piece!            

    SQUARE2SQUARE NECKLINE

    Like the V-NECK NECKLINE in that it has a strong, defined shape to it. A SQUARE NECKLINE dips down and has the sharp structured outline of a square. Goes well for stiff fabrics, designs, and garments.              

    HALTER2HALTER NECKLINE

    A neckline that is free at the shoulders and arms, is open at the back, and hangs from the neck alone. This is a common design in all kinds of garments from shirts and dresses to bathing suits. It’s a very feminine kind of neckline that looks great when showing off the shoulders and back. The strap around the neck can be detachable or a single piece, and is sometimes closed with ties and a bow. This design is used for both shirt and dress tops.        

    ASYMMETRIC2ASYMMETRIC NECKLINE

    ASYMMETRICAL NECKLINES can vary in design. Some have a neckline paired with a strap, others have one side with a cut-out, or even a single-strap design—the list can go on. The point is to have the two sides designed differently, hence the asymmetry. These designs are great for more modern and stylish looks.          

    MOCKNECK2MOCKNECK NECKLINE

    MOCK NECK NECKLINES have necklines that come up very high and sit above the clavicle, and they are finished with a thin, standing collar. These necklines are different from the turtle-neck collar design; the collar does not fold over.              

    CREWNECK2CREWNECK NECKLINE

    These necklines sit lower than a MOCK NECK NECKLINE and have a flat collar that is more like a ribbed-knit trim. They look like the necklines of pullover sweaters and resemble a SCOOP NECKLINE. These are worn for comfort and are usually not incorporated into fancier designs.            

    HIGHNECK2HIGHNECK NECKLINE

    Like a HALTER NECKLINE, but with an attached back. These necklines are a more conservative design, but they still retain the classy appeal. A high-standing collar paired with a HIGH NECK NECKLINE is a stunning look that is also great for showing off one’s arms.            

    BOATNECK2BOATNECK NECKLINE

    BOAT NECK NECKLINES are another feminine design. Tops with this neckline rest from the shoulders and have a wide opening for the neckline that hangs just a bit in the front and back in a kind of bowed shape. This is where the “boat neck” image comes from, as in the underside of a boat. It’s a very elegant garment style that uses the larger volume of fabric to help the wearer look smaller and more petite.          

    COWL2COWL NECKLINE

    Like an over-sized turtle neck design, a COWL NECKLINE sports a huge and loose collar that sits around the neck. The collar of these necklines is usually very long when stretched out, but they are intended to sit gathered around the neck. It’s a very comfortable style of fashion that’s great for knits and other soft-handed fabrics.          

    ILLUSION2ILLUSION NECKLINE

    ILLUSION NECKLINES are one of the more decorative types of necklines that play with empty space. Paired with low-laying necklines, the empty space between the upper breast line and up to the neck is usually filled in with a sheer or see-through kind of fabric like lace or netting.            

    STRAPLESS2STRAPLESS NECKLINE

    These necklines also sit low and are exactly what their name implies: necklines without straps. The actual shape of the neckline can vary (like STRAIGHT to SWEETHEART NECKLINES), but STRAPLESS designs are identified as any neckline design not supported with straps. Support for these types of necklines come instead in the form of things like boning, close-fitting cuts, and elastic.          

    STRAIGHT2STRAIGHT NECKLINE

    A neckline that literally goes straight across the chest. This neckline doesn’t usually reach up to the clavicle or actual neck on the wearer, but sits just under the arms. It’s a popular design choice for dresses and gowns as a strapless design, but it's also paired with spaghetti straps just as often.            

    SWEETHEART2SWEETHEART NECKLINE

    A strapless neckline design that gets its name from its “heart-shaped” hemline at the top of the bodice. These are often used on dresses and gowns as well as corsets and are especially popular for wedding gowns.              

    PLUNGE2PLUNGE NECKLINE

    A PLUNGE NECKLINE is a neckline whose straps or front-facing bodice cuts deep down the middle of the chest to under the breast line. It’s not exactly a type of cut-out, but it does incorporate exposure into the design. This is a design that’s popular with gowns and dresses, and its straps are often gathered together, giving the cups of the shirt or dress top a pleated look.             What neckline designs have you incorporated into your projects before? Or if you haven't worked on shirts before, what necklines would you like to learn how to make or work with?
  • Mood Style: Bomber Jacket with a Twist

    My newest obsession along with the rest of the fashion population, is the bomber jacket.  The beauty of the bomber jacket is it's ability to put a casual spin on any look. What I wanted to do was make an effort to elevate the simple bomber jacket by making it in this beautiful silk and wool fabric , give it an exaggerated sleeve and peplum and line it in this silk charmeuse. I don't think there are enough descriptive words to explain how beautiful this silk is.  The moment it arrived and I opened the package, I fell in love.  The color is gorgeous and looks and feels rich.  It cuts and sews beautifully and  It's a medium weight perfect for fall and based off the weather were having, winter as well. Chandler's jacket was made with leftover fabric from our digitally printed dress and skirt. The pattern I used for my jacket was this Burdastyle downloaded jacket with the following pattern alterations: -Added 1.5" to the width of the collar -Added silk piping along the back bodice seam -Added a peplum by cutting 1-10"x50" and 2- 10"x25" -Added a 1 1/2" band at the bottom of the peplum -Used the sleeve to McCall's M5937 and added 12" to the width of the bottom of the sleeve to create a fuller sleeve.  Pleat the sleeve when attaching it to the cuff -Added a ribbed cuff -Added a 20" brass jacket zipper Chandler's jacket was made using a self drafted pattern. *The pants are diy previously seen here bomber-jacket_mood_ bomber-jacket2 bomber-jacket3 bomber-jacket4 bomber-jacket6 bomber-jacket5 bomber-jacket7
  • Mood DIY: Removeable Collar Tutorial

    featuredimage

    Ever wanted to add a collar to your ensemble without permanently altering your top? Removable shirt collars are a simple and quick way to do it. Removable collars can help add a pop of color or a print to your shirt, help dress up a basic tee, or just keep your neck warm! There are a few different styles you can go with, too, like angled collars, peter pan collars, and more, plus you can play around with the design for your closures and how you attach the collar to your top! Trims are perfect for this project, too, because it’s so easy to embellish them. You could use a piece of embroidery or ribbon to tie your collar on—there’s lots of room to experiment! That’s what’s so appealing about removable collars; they’re wonderful to work with and make since the design is so versatile and open-ended. To help give you some ideas, we’ve put together a quick tutorial for how to sew an angled collar as well as a peter pan collar. Removable collars look especially cute tied with a bow, so get ready for ribbons! The Materials List will be separated into three lists, one for each of the three collar types that this tutorial goes over, so you can have an easier time planning out your own project!

    Materials List

    DSC_0258

    Nautical Collar 1/4 YDs Optic White Mercerized Cotton Shirting 1/2 YDs Navy Corded Crochet Trim - 3.5" 1/2 YDs White Water Jet Loom Interlining and Fusible 1/2 YDs 1/4" Light Navy Single Face Satin Ribbon 22 Egg Shell 250m Gutermann Sew All Thread Pattern Pieces #4 and #5 from Vogue Pattern #V8927  

    DSC_0268

    Striped Peter Pan Collar 1/4 YDs Black/Multicolored Striped Floral Cotton Poplin 1/4 YDs Optic White Mercerized Cotton Shirting 1/2 YDs 1/2" Misty Turquoise Single Face Satin Ribbon 1/4 YDs White Water Jet Loom Interlining and Fusible Peter Pan Collar Pattern by Mood Peter Pan Collar Pattern by Mood 10 Black 250m Gutermann Sew All Thread  

    DSC_0266

    Cherry Blossom Peter Pan Collar 1/4 YDs Italian Ivory Solid Cotton Shirting 1/2 YDs 1" Metallic Rose Floral Lace Trim 1/4 YDs White Water Jet Loom Interlining and Fusible Peter Pan Collar Pattern by Mood Peter Pan Collar Pattern by Mood 323 Old Rose 100m Gutermann Sew All Thread   Notions Iron and Ironing Board Mood Brand Lia Sewing Machine Craft Pints 8" Fiskars All-Purpose Scissors Dritz Size 9 Sharp Needles   Nautical Collar The first to go over is the Nautical style collar! Since this is a piece from a brand-name pattern, this tutorial will focus on how to go about embellishing with the navy crochet trim.

    DSC_0206

    When you cut out your fabric and interlining, you'll need two cuts of the collar and the collar stand, as well as one cut of interlining for each of those pieces. Iron your interlining to each of the cuts, and grab your navy trim. The navy trim should be layered between one collar cut and one collar stand cut, with the interlining sides facing OUT, and when placing the trim between your two pieces, line the straight edge side of the trim at the points of the top side of the collar piece. Do not turn and pin the trim to go with the curve!! You want it to be straight to get the look in the final photo!

    Pin the layers together, making sure the collar stand piece is longer than the actual collar (this should NOT be gathered!). and sew the plain seam. Trim along the seam you just sewed.

    DSC_0212

    You're going to do the same with the other pieces, minus the trim layer!

    DSC_0213

    This next step is similar to when you're making a pillow; pin your two halves right side together. You're going to sew along these lines:

    DSC_02132

    We need the three unmarked spots left open so that we can turn the collar right-side-out and also have a place to attach our ribbon closures! Once you sew these seams, clip along all the edges carefully, trim any excess threads needed, and turn your collar right-side-out. Don't cut your seams!

    From here, press your collar flat so it's easier to work with. You'll need to make sure all the corners are filled out (use a clean, thin dowl or paint brush handle!).

    DSC_0227

    Now take your 1/2 of ribbon and cut it in half, and trim the other end so that they're the same length. Pin the ribbon into the open edges of the collar stand, and then go ahead and top stitch a border around your collar stand piece. 

    After that is done, flip your collar stand up and iron it down. Tie your bow, and you're all done!   Striped Peter Pan Collar

    Next up is our striped collar! These steps are a bit simpler. For the pattern, we drew one up ourselves. Click here to download the pattern! Print out the pattern and cut out the paper along the lines, seam allowance is included!

    DSC_0144

    Cut out your two fabrics, one collar pattern piece in the striped fabric and one in the white, and then one cut of interlining. Iron the interlining to wrong side of the striped fabric.

    DSC_0181

    Pin your pieces right sides together and sew along the borders, making sure to leave openings like in the picture below here:

    DSC_0182

    The opening in the collar is so you can turn it right-side-out, and the openings at the tips are for adding your ribbon!

    DSC_0184

    Make sure to clip along the curved edges and trim an lingering threads, then turn the collar right-side-out. Fill out the shape using a clean dowl or other thin tool, and then press it flat wit your iron.

    DSC_0196

    Next, take your 1/2 yard of ribbon and cut it in half, and trim the other ends.

    DSC_0198

    Go ahead and pin the ribbon into the openings you left behind with the shiny side of the ribbon facing out. Using black thread, top-stitch around the entire border, making sure to back-stitch over where you inserted the ribbon.

    DSC_0201

    And then you're all done!

    Cherry Blossom Peter Pan Collar

    And lastly, is the cherry blossom peter pan collar!

    This collar has the same steps as the striped collar, but with a few added steps beforehand as well as skipping any top-stitching.

    DSC_0253

    This trim is an embroidery trim which means in order to attach it, it must be hand-sewn, and since it's such a loose trim design, I highly suggest pinning your trim down onto your already-cut fabric pieces in the way that you want it to lay for the final product, like so:

    DSC_0145

    Do this for both sides before starting to sew. It's best to get the trim to lay as symmetrically as possible.

    DSC_0146

    Sewing down just the leaves and flowers is enough to keep it flat and stable. Don't pull your threads too tight, because you want them to lay flat, and make sure to tie a knot before starting each leaf or flower and after you've completed it. It's also important to use like-colored thread (the thread listed above in the materials list matches the pink of the embroidery thread very well).

    After this step, continue as you would for the striped peter pan color, EXCEPT for top-stitching the final border. This collar does not need to be top-stitched! Make sure to iron the backside of this collar, not on the front--it's safest to keep from ironing the embroidered trim!

    And there you have it! Three simple and quick removable collar designs. See how you can change little things and make a completely different design? What designs do you think you'd like to try? Are there any trims that you'd love to see on a removable collar?

  • Mad About Plaid! "Men's Flannel Shirt" Style Post

    It's definitely flannel season! With that being said, my hubby has been wanting me to make him a shirt since forever. So, I decided to make him a nice cozy, rustic plaid flannel. Perfect for Fall if I do say so myself. Here's what I used: 3yds of Red/Blue/Brown/White Plaid Cotton Flannel: Product #308634 from MoodFabrics.com 1 yd of Blue Denim-like Cotton Chambray: Product # 308653 from MoodFabrics.com Simplicity Pattern #1544BB-Option D Men's Shirt. This shirt actually took me a couple of days to complete because it is so detailed. This is my first attempt at menswear and I'm pretty pleased with the outcome. I added a contrast denim-like chambray to the button placket, underside of the pockets, back tab, and under-collar. The contrast really brings out the blue in the pattern. This flannel is super soft and feels really yummy! The look was completed with a waffle thermal layered underneath. Mood Fabrics has so many great plaids to choose from if you're looking to make something similar. I think I'll be making myself one pretty soon. Enjoy!

    Plaid 1 copy

    Plaid 4

     Plaid 3

  • All About Sleeves

    Sleeves_Graphic_JPEG

    Sleeves_Pattern_Graphic_PNG

    Sleeve designs can be a little bit intimidating. Drafting them is kind of a science on its own, and it's hard to imagine what shape you need to start with if you have no prior experience with patterning them yourself; trial and error is usually inevitable, and if you don't have the time to commit to it, it'll probably never get done. That's why we're bringing this All About Sleeves post to you!

    Whether you're looking for a shirt sleeve pattern but can't seem to find the right one, or you want to make custom sleeve  patterns for yourself, we think the information here could at least help you get started. We've drawn up a chart and images of a bunch of different types of sleeves used in fashion and costume sewing for you to use as a reference, as well as descriptions, notes, and tips for drafting them on your own! Knowing the shape is half the battle, and combined together with a little math and measurement, the task should be a lot more manageable for you!

    Below, we have each sleeve type highlighted as well as a magnified image of the comparison between what the sleeve will look like as its pattern piece versus what it will generally look like finished on a person. Take a look and see what sleeve types you might want to try drafting patterns for!

    T-SHIRT SLEEVE

    TSHIRT Ahh, the t-shirt sleeve! One of the three "basic designs" of sleeve patterns. It’s good to have a t-shirt sleeve pattern handy at all times (making it out of something sturdy like cardboard or poster paper is a good option) so you can use it as a base for other sleeve designs. This type of sleeve is short by design and can be finished at the end in a number of ways, though t-shirts usually just have the hem folded under and sewn down for the cuff.  

    CUFFED SHIRT SLEEVE

    CUFFED The CUFFED SHIRT SLEEVE is another staple of sleeve patterns that you should familiarize yourself with. It’s basically just a long version of the T-SHIRT SLEEVE, but the shape is a little less squared (though you could certainly make the shape of the sleeve straight, if you wanted to!) and the sleeve tapers just a little towards the cuff. The sleeve should be gathered a bit when the cuff is added, too.  

    BISHOP SLEEVE

    BISHOP This sleeve is one of my favorites, since it plays with shape and weight on arms! If you look between the images for the BISHOP SLEEVE and the T-SHIRT SLEEVE, you’ll notice that the BISHOP SLEEVE’s shoulder has a narrower shape. This adjustment is intentional; it helps the shape of the sleeve fit closer to your shoulder. The sleeve also flares out smoothly down the length, and the design has a much wider cuff than a T-SHIRT or CUFFED SHIRT SLEEVE. BISHOP SLEEVE designs are gathered at the wrist, which is the reason for the flare. The wider, bottom hem is gathered like in the photo and is attached to a cuff piece. The BISHOP SLEEVE cuff.  

    BELL SLEEVE

    BELL The BELL SLEEVE design is pretty similar to the BISHOP SLEEVE; it has the same narrower shape to the shoulder, and the cuff hem is also flared, but the difference is that the sleeve shape itself is squared. See in the picture how the lines are parallel to each other until the flare starts? That’s the “square” shape. The flare is also a little more exaggerated in this design, too. This is what gives the BELL SLEEVE its "bell" shape! BELL SLEEVES do not gather at the wrist either. The cuff is loose and flows at the wrist. It’s a very elegant design.  

    BATWING SLEEVE

    BATWING The BATWING SLEEVE is the only one of its kind in this guide; this type of sleeve is not separate from the bodice of the garment. See in the picture how the bodice pattern piece flows as one into the shape of the sleeve? That’s intentional. Instead of a single seam lining the underside of the arm, there are two seams, one above and below the arm, in the final product. The seam lines of the bodice will line up with that of the sleeves. The design also has a curved shape for under the arm and is intended to be worn loose. The hanging fabric here gives the design’s “batwing” look. These types of sleeves are flexible in terms of length so long as this batwing shape is maintained. In our example, there is a long, fitted cuff, but you could make a shorter or longer cuff or sleeve. The choice is yours!  

    PUFF SLEEVE

    PUFF In comparison to the T-SHIRT SLEEVE, the PUFF SLEEVE is wider at the shoulder and even wider at the cuff hem. With this design, the cuff must be gathered to fit nicely around your arm so you will the puffed shape. PUFF SLEEVES are incredibly cute and look best on a fitted bodice!  

    ¾ SLEEVE/BRACELET SLEEVE

    3_4 A ¾ SLEEVE design should look familiar, because it’s the same as the T-SHIRT and CUFFED SHIRT SLEEVES, the only difference is the length of the sleeve itself. ¾ SLEEVES usually stop halfway down the forearm and can be either the squared or tapered shape (our images show the tapered design). Fun fact—this type of sleeve is also called a BRACELET SLEEVE, because it’s short enough so that you can show off bracelets that you’re wearing!  

    PETAL SLEEVE

    PETAL PETAL SLEEVES are unique in that their shape is created by overlapping a two cut sleeve pieces. These can be short or longer, but they often have a tulip-like look to them. The shape of the shoulder is a gentle slope and the two pieces basically mirror each other when overlapped.  

    CAPE SLEEVE

    CAPE Big and flowing, CAPE SLEEVES are given their name because it actually looks like you’re wearing a cape! The pattern shape for sleeves like these are huge and very wide. Think of a 45-degree angle coming down from your shoulder. They’re great for exaggerating weight and volume, or for wrapping yourself up in your favorite fabric.  

    DROP-SHOULDER SLEEVE

    DROPSHOULDER DROP-SHOULDER SLEEVES are a fairly subtle alteration. They’re usually just an extension of the shoulder line on the bodice pattern piece—not from the sleeve itself. If you look carefully at the picture, you can notice this distinction! This type of sleeve is great for pajamas and sweaters, because the cut is usually loose and unrestricted, making for a comfortable lounge shirt!  

    BUTTERFLY SLEEVE

    BUTTERFLY BUTTERFLY SLEEVES are a larger sleeve and look like butterfly wings when you lift your arms! They’re great when made with fabrics like knits that are loose, and they give your look a very elegant and petite touch.  

    FLUTTER SLEEVE

    FLUTTER Similar to the BUTTERFLY SLEEVE, FLUTTER SLEEVES are like a shorter version. They have a similar shape to the top of their pattern design, but they aren’t as long and are usually cut a little wider. This is another elegant and petite style you could go with for warmer weather!  

    MARIE SLEEVE

    MARIE These types of sleeves are cut like long rectangles and are usually gathered in multiple segments. The shoulder line is set very wide and shallow, too, which will give your sleeve a big and billowing shape from the shoulder all the way down. Elastic can be used to help maintain the shape of these segments, or if kept looser, something stiffer like trims or ribbons.  

    RAGLAN SLEEVE

    RAGLAN You’ve probably seen a shirt with RAGLAN SLEEVES somewhere, right? These are incredibly comfortable for lounge shirts since the cut of the sleeve is loose on the shoulder. The shoulder's hemline of the sleeve is different from others, because it reaches all the way to the neckline. It’s often a similar length to the ¾ SLEEVE.  

    FLOUNCE SLEEVE

    FLOUNCE FLOUNCE SLEEVES are a combination of a ¾ SLEEVE and a circular pattern piece that has a similar shape to a circle skirt. Think of it like a mini circle skirt, but for your arm! The actual sleeve can range in length, and so can the “skirt,” so this design can go a lot of ways!  

    LEG-OF-MUTTON SLEEVE

    MUTTON Wide at the shoulder and tapered down to the wrist, LEG-OF-MUTTON SLEEVES get their name from looking like a sheep’s leg. The final look of it has a large puff around the shoulder and narrows down most of the arm and to the wrist. The puff is mostly at the shoulder and does not continue down.  

    POET SLEEVE

    POET The pattern shape for POET SLEEVES isn’t as wide as a CAPE SLEEVE, but it does have a bit of an angle, so it’s kind of in the middle between a CAPE SLEEVE and a MARIE SLEEVE. And similar to the MARIE SLEEVE, it is gathered just above the wrist, but only once, to give a bell-ish shape to the top of the sleeve. POET SLEEVES also sometimes have an uneven shape at the wrist, kind of like a wave, to give it a flowing shape when finished!  

    SLIT SLEEVE

    SLIT SLIT SLEEVES are exactly what they sound like—sleeves with a slit down the center. These are an open-type sleeve that are a lovely option for revealing shoulder designs. This design flows very nicely, too. Take the pattern shape for a MARIE SLEEVE, draw in a narrower shape for around the shoulder, and cut it down the center to get your two pieces!  

    TIERED SLEEVE

    TIERED TIERED SLEEVES require a little bit of work, because—like the PETAL SLEEVE—you need to work multiple, overlapped pattern pieces. Four pieces, to be precise. In the picture for the TIERED SLEEVE, you can see the four different pieces, all longer than the last. You can sew them all together as one big piece along the sides for a more stable shape or sew them together at the shoulder for a looser flow for the tiers.  

    CAP SLEEVE

    CAP Perhaps the tiniest sleeve of all in this compilation, the CAP SLEEVE! Obviously, this sleeve is very short, just a little lip coming out from the shoulder hemline. The pattern shape is very wide and has the slightest, gentle slope to it. It’s size usually doesn’t range, and its pattern shape is pretty unique as well. It’s a design often use for t-shirt-cut designs.     And there you have it! Some of the most common types of sleeves used in fashion broken down. There are other sleeve types available, but hopefully this is enough to help get you started and have an easier time planning how to draft out your sleeves! Have you made any of these yourself before reading this article? What other sleeve types do you think would be useful to know about? Leave some comments and share your knowledge and projects!
10
1 2 3 4 NEXT