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DIY

  • All About Dress Silhouettes

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    Hello, and welcome to another All About article from Mood! This time we're talking about dress silhouettes and shapes!

    There are so many kinds of dresses out there that it can be a little daunting trying to wrap our heads around their little differences, and so we wanted to collect a handful of some of the more well-known and popular styles and provide some insights about their designs and what makes them each unique!

    Perhaps you're an at-home hobbyist looking into educating yourself on some professional fashion designing, or maybe you're a professional seamstress looking for some references to collect for your own convenience? For anyone and everyone, this article is here to help! We've created images and paired them with details and other tidbits of information to help you get through your project. Take a look below and see what styles you're familiar with, what's new, and maybe even some dress styles you already own!

    trapezeTRAPEZE

    A TRAPEZE dress is a dress style that is narrow at the shoulders and very wide at the hem of the dress. It’s like an A-LINE dress, but the TRAPEZE dress has a much wider hem than the A-LINE, and they often end below the knee.

         

     

             

    tentTENT

    A TENT dress is a style that is wide like the TRAPEZE dress, but the hem is flounced. TENT dresses also do not fall below the knee like the TRAPEZE dress usually does. Wear one of these for a bit more flare than you would wear on a casual day!                   a_line

    A-LINE

    The A-LINE dress is a popular style whose silhouette is narrow at the shoulders and gradually flares out towards the hem of the dress. This is where it gets its name from, because it’s shaped like a capital letter “A.” These dresses usually end somewhere at the knee or higher, never below. A-LINE styles are great casual dresses, but semi-formal settings work well for them, too!            

     

    pencilPENCIL

    The PENCIL dress style is one that sports a straight and narrow cut, which makes it fit close to the body. In more modern fashion, PENCIL dresses can be found with rather short hem lengths, but their original design is usually a hem that falls to the knee. Depending on the design, these dresses are nice for office-wear.                  

    bellBELL

    BELL dresses are a beautiful style that are cut fitted at the bodice, and they have a big, wide skirt that billows out in a bell shape. These dresses can be both short and long with hems ranging anywhere from the knee to the ankle. These types of dresses are more popular for semi-formal to formal social events and gatherings.                

    balloonBALLOON

    BALLOON dresses have a similar shape to the BELL dress, because they have the fitted bodice at the top and a wide hem, but BALLOON dresses are loose and flow. They have all the fabric of a BELL dress without the bell shape, so the hem bounces with you as you walk. This is where the “balloon” part of their name comes from! This style is a very cute one to show off and is great for casual and semi-formal wear!                

    mermaidMERMAID

    The MERMAID dress is a very formal and long style of dress. It is cut straight and narrow like the PENCIL dress to the knee, and from there the skirt flows out into a flounced hem. This is where the “Mermaid” name comes from—the dress looks like a mermaid’s tail! Sometimes the “tail” of these dresses are long enough to be considered a dress train. They’re a very elegant style.                

    tshirtT-SHIRT

    The T-SHIRT dress is a combined style of a PENCIL dress with short sleeves! Taking the straight cut and adding the short sleeves gives this dress design the silhouette of a capital letter “T”! This, like the TENT dress, is another style to wear when you’re looking for a bit more flare!                  

    EmpireEMPIRE

    The EMPIRE dress silhouette comes with a fitted and very high “waistline” that sits just below the bust. This gives the wearer the appearance of having a higher waistline. From the bustline, the dress is cut straight and loose, so it skims right along the wearer’s shape and ends with a hem at the ankle. The skirt of these dresses is gathered, too, so while the skirt is cut straight along the body, it flows. This longer style is another that is for a more elegant and formal occasion.              

    charlestonCHARLESTON

    The CHARLESTON dress has a silhouette that is semi-fitted at the top, has a square shape along the hem, and is always designed to leave the arms uncovered. The entire fit is loose, though, so it’s not narrow like the PENCIL design or fitted like the BELL design. Probably the most notable piece of this design, however, is the dropped waistline which sits at the hips instead of the waist. Another more colloquial name for this dress style is the “Flapper dress”! It’s an iconic style that was very popular in 1920’s America.              

    sheathSHEATH

    The SHEATH dress is the same as the PENCIL dress, except longer! Straight and narrow cut. But while the PENCIL dress hem doesn’t fall below the knee, SHEATH dress hems do! These hems don’t fall to the ankle, but usually just below the knee—never past mid-calf.                  

    fitnflareFIT’N’FLARE

    And lastly, the beloved FIT’N’FLARE dress! These dresses are often mixed up with A-LINE dress, since the FIT’N’FLARE design also sports a narrow top and wider hem, but the FIT’N’FLARE style is always fitted at the waistline whereas the A-LINE dress is not! These dresses are very popular today and are great for both casual and formal-wear occasions! Plus, they look good on most body types!                 And there you have it! Hopefully you've got a good grasp now on the different types and styles of dresses available for you to incorporate into your designs and projects! Have you sewn any of these kinds of dress shapes before? Which are your favorites to work with?
  • Mood DIY: Hooded Bell Sleeve Fur Jacket w/ Free Sewing Template

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    The fur jacket trend doesn't seem to be fading as autumn slowly turns to winter, and honestly I can't complain. With all of Mood's new faux furs hitting the site, I've been dying to work with more of them.

    My first venture into faux fur sewing was just a couple months ago, with a long vest you can find right here (I also explain the best way to cut and sew with fur!). For this project, I made the body of the jacket almost the exact same way, however I chose to crop it to just 18". Then, of course, came the sleeves and hood.

    To save you some work, I drew up a template of the hood I made. It's big and cozy, and should fit most adults! Below, I'll be explaining an easy way to draft a bell sleeve pattern.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    Hood Template Layout DOWNLOAD HOOD TEMPLATE HERE

    If you've never drafted a sleeve before, it's easiest to alter a sleeve pattern that you already know fits. For this one, I took a pattern piece from a button up shirt. Since, it's from something more form fitting than a jacket, I thought I might need to change up the top as well, but after measuring the curve and the arm hole of my jacket, I discovered they were both the same length - perfect!

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    Next, I needed to create the bell shape. I began by cutting 5 evenly spaced, straight lines from the bottom of the sleeve until about 1/4" from the top.

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    Each was then spaced out until I had the desired length at the bottom of the bell. Between the center two strips, I left two inches, then 3" and 5" respectively going outward.

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    The sleeve should be symmetrical, so I did the same measurements on both sides.

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    Lastly, I just needed to trace and connect the dots. The top and sides are very similar to the original sleeve, but the bottom now creates a slight curve!

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    Once all the pattern pieces are drafted, they go together pretty easily. The actual sewing of the jacket probably only took an hour. The side hood panels go on either side of the rectangular strip and the whole thing attaches at the neckline of the jacket.

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    The lining pieces are the same, so they get sewn together similarly. To attach the lining to the fur, I sewed it right-sides together, leaving a small opening along the bottom back to put it right-side out. A quick slip-stitch closed it up!

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  • Mood DIY: Patched Denim Moto Jacket

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    Patches, denim, and moto jackets - all three hit runways this past Fashion Week, and all three have made their way into today's project! Moto jackets are a great project since there are so many styles and directions you can go in. Make it in a classic leather for a daring look, or try a warm wool for the winter. This time I decided to give one of Mood's new denims a go; the drape is comfortable for a jacket and the herringbone design is absolutely beautiful.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    I went with the Larissa jacket pattern, excluding the elbow patches and tabs, and cut the collar, waistband, shoulder gussets, and under sleeves in a contrasting black denim.

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    I added three 3/4" spikes to each corner of the collar. The back screws off, so all I needed to do to install them was punch a small hole with an awl, insert the screw, and screw the spike on!

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    Mood has been growing the selection of patches and appliques, so I knew this was finally the project where I used some of the ones I've had my eye on. A varsity letter went perfectly on the lapel, and I added a sequined Drunk in Love patch on one of the pockets, because you can never have too much Beyoncé in your life. Each was hand-stitched on; make sure you don't accidentally sew your pocket shut!

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    As soon as I saw this beaded snake applique, I knew it need to creep over a shoulder so that's exactly where I placed it! I especially love that when the lapel and collar are down, you can see the snake's little head peeking out between them.

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    A buckle closure at the bottom of the zipper brought the whole thing together! Both of the denims I worked with went easily through the machine, which was great; and while the herringbone had a softer drape, the solid black was a little more stiff, so I was able to skip interfacing on the collar.

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    Now that it's done, I can't wait to add more patches! Which ones will you be adding to your moto jacket?

  • Mood DIY: Leather Card Holder

    I'm currently making my website for my leather goods brand, Brandhyze + Co, and thought...."hey, I'm gonna need a trusty new card case holder for my cards once they come in" (hope she doesn't mind, used my hairstylist's cards here to demo). :) So, I made a template, grabbed some leather from Mood Fabrics, and got to work folding and sewing -- it's really easy! You can add a snap, paint on your initials, etc...the possibilities are endless. Have fun making your own.Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 4.25.01 PMLeather Card Holder 2SUPPLIES: pattern, rotary cutter/scissors, 3-4oz leather, skiver, tragacanth, edge burnisher, edge note, a q-tip, needle and sinew. Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 4.22.44 PMHOW-TO: 1. Cut out the template, trace it on to the leather, and then cut it out of the leather. 2. I wanted the stiffness and "stand-up" that a slightly thicker leather would have, but that thickness also made the case hard to fold. So, I used a skiver to shave off some of the "flesh" of the leather to make my job a little easier. (Note: I learned this the hard way while making a duffle bag once...but you'll want to go a little slower until you get the hang of skiving, or else with a new blade you may shave a hole right through your leather). 3. After you shave some of the back off, there may be some leather sticking up along the edges. If so, use a little tragacanth and a burnishing wheel to smooth everything down. 4. Crack a window and lay down some paper towel or newspaper to coat the edges of your leather. I usually use about 2 coats and let it dry for about half hour before picking it up again. Lastly....I used a leather sewing machine, but feel free to use the method I always fall back on -- good ol' hand stitching (using the saddle stitch) like I did here. Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 4.25.01 PMBrandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of the award winning blog, Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on Dr. Oz, The View, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for over a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow; and has been a contributor for the Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, Super Money, Good Housekeeping, and Newsday Westchester, to name a few. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics

  • Leather Belt DIY

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    Belts are an essential part of any wardrobe, but they're often a rather pricey detail for such a small accessory, don't you think? Especially in the men's department; even though belts sold at stores boast high prices and quality, sometimes they don't even last a whole year! That's why I wanted to try making one myself and seeing how much of the price I could cut down. I was pleasantly surprised with the results, so I wanted to share them with all of you, too.

    This DIY is applicable for all types of fabrics or materials used for making belts, so whether you use a leather material like I did or even something like canvas or cotton, this tutorial will be good for you!

    Here's a list of what I used:

    Materials List

    - .25 YDs of Midnight Bottega Basketwoven Cow Leather - Any belt buckle - 279 Dark Midnight 100m Gutermann Sew All ThreadMood Brand Lia Sewing MachineDritz Grommet Plier Kit or  Dritz Tapered AwlDritz Tailor's ChalkDritz Size 3/9 Sharp Needles Optional: - Leather Binder or Rubber Cement - Piece of soft scrap fabric Style 2026 100/16 Singer Pins & Needles (good if using thick fabric/material) Making a belt is surprisingly easy. Don't be too intimidated by how long the page might seem; I think seeing will be easier than trying to just write the steps out, so there are lots of pictures with my notes! You can use the fabric that I listed in the materials list, but you can apply these tutorial instructions to pretty much any fabric you'd like! Once you have the basic idea down, sewing a belt together is a quick job! .

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    The first thing you should do is determine what buckle you want to use! Buckles range in all different sizes, styles, and widths, and whatever buckle you use will be crucial to deciding what size your belt will be. The buckle I used is  the bronze one in the picture above, so any measurements I talk about specifically are designed for that one.

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    Since you should have more than enough extra fabric to work with from your 1/4 yard of material, cut a couple of pieces off in the direction of the grain your fabric will be in for your final product and measure out how wide your belt will be. Don't just go by the width of the buckle's right side; your belt needs to be able to slide comfortably over the side where the clasp will rest on the left side. Sometimes the left side width is smaller than the right side because of rounded edges, so keep this in mind!

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    Take your test pieces and try them out. In the top buckle, 1.5" in. fit comfortably while the bottom one need an 1" in. width. It's very useful to test out the widths before attaching your buckles! After this, you should test to see what length you need for your strip of fabric. Take a tape measure and determine the width of your hips, or wherever your belt will be sitting when you wear it. Whatever number you come up with, add about 8-10" in. This should be the length of the fabric for your belt altogether! Keep this number in mind when you go to cut your fabric. I wanted a belt that was a little longer, and so I went with a 45" in. length and a 1" in. width.

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    Once you know how long and wide you need your belt to be, get to cutting! If your fabric is thick enough, you should only need one cut, but if you have a thinner fabric, you may want to double up or even add some thick interlining between the layers. A belt doesn't need to be incredibly thick, but it should be durable! You want your belts to last a long time. This fabric has a backing and is thick enough with just one layer, so I only needed to cut one piece for the belt.

    Just a note to add: the piece I cut here isn't the piece I used for my final product--it's wider. I wanted to make sure it would be big enough to see the differences. I trimmed this piece down further to the 1" in. measurement I needed for my bronze buckle after initially cutting this piece.

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    If your fabric has a pretty obvious grain, you may need to go back and trim the edges. With this leather fabric, I wanted to trim the sides so the edges lined up nicely with the squares of the basketwoven strips.

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    After you've trimmed your fabric down, you should trim the tail ends of your fabric strip! At least one tail end should be cut straight so that it has cornered edges. The other tail end you could be squared off as well, or you could round it off like I did here:

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    For this tutorial, the squared off end will be hidden and the rounded edge will be visible when worn! Depending on the shape you cut it into, it can change the entire look of your belt, so have fun and experiment!

    You should also take the time to double-check that your strip of fabric for your belt will fit now that it's trimmed down. Remember, the extra 8-11" in. will the be extra tail end of your belt that slips away in the belt loops of your pants when you wear it. You don't want this to be too long or too short; too long, and the belt will look too big, but too short, and the belt will look too small for you!

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    Once you have your piece shaped how you like it, go ahead and top-stitch your fabric . Make sure your bobbin as well as your spool of thread on top are full enough that you can stitch all around the border of your belt in one go! While this isn't mandatory, if will look best if you only have to back-stitch on the first squared end since it'll be hidden away later on! Work slowly and carefully--this top stitch will keep your belt together, but it will also look beautifully decorated if it's done well!

    For my belt, I did a top-stitch very close to the edge so that it was centered on the strips of the basketweave. If you're using a different fabric, feel free to guide to a 5/8" or 1/4" in. seam allowance. Start on the bottom corner of the tail end (where you can see I left the threads on the left side), go down the end, and then pivot at the corner to turn and continue all the way down the length of your belt.

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    Once you get to the other end, top-stitch according to whatever shape you made your other end into. Try to make sure this looks clean! Continue back down to the other end where you started again, back-stitch once your reach your the starting point, and trim your loose threads.

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    When you're done top-stitch, it should look nice and pretty!

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    Once your belt piece is done, put it to the side. We need to make a stay-loop for the belt now! Cut a small strip of your fabric that you're using. It should be thinner than the width you used for your belt and long enough to wrap around the width of your belt with a little extra to overlap with. Keep the edges squared. Make sure it's trimmed and nice, and then top-stitch it in the same way that you did your belt piece.

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     Next, you need to hand-sew your loop together. It shouldn't take much thread, but be extra careful if you're working with a thicker fabric. Invest in a thimble for hand-sewing with thicker fabrics--it'll save you a world of hurt!

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    When your loop is complete, slip it onto your belt!

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    For the next step, we need to cut a hole for where the arm of the buckle will go through. Measure about 1.5" in. on the end of the squared tail end of your belt and mark this spot in the center of the belt's width and then use your grommet hole cutter to punch a hole into the spot you marked. At this point, you could use your leather binder (if you're using leather like I did) or rubber cement to coat the raw edges of this hole you just punched to keep the fabric from coming apart. It's not completely necessary, but I recommend it if you're worried about the fabric fraying!

    You should now be able to slip the arm of your buckle through and fold the tail end to wrap around and behind the back of the buckle.

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    Use some Wonder Clips to hold the tail end in place and sew along the tail end to secure your buckle.

    And last but not least, we need to punch in holds for securing your belt when you wear it!

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    Try on your belt and slip it through your now-installed buckle. Find where you need the belt to be tightened to so it sits comfortably where you'll be wearing it and mark this point with your tailor's chalk. Remove your belt and use a tape measure to mark where the other holes need to be. I marked two on each side of the first marking I made about 1" in. apart each. This will allow you to use your belt regardless if you need it to be looser or tighter!

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    When you have your markings where you'd like them, take your grommet hole punch again and get to work punching holes over your markings. Here's a little tip: use a napkin or scrap piece of softer fabric to hold against the front when you punch the holes to keep the front of your fabric from coming out messy!

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    Clean buckle holes for your belt! Again, use your leather binder or rubber cement to seal these.

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    And now you should be done! Slip it on and try out your new fashion-forward belt you made for half the cost of what you see in stores. If you need to buy the tools, making a belt can be a little extra money, but once you have the tools to use, you can easily make more for a small fraction of the cost!

  • Mood DIY: African Print Peplum Shirt

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    The weather in NYC is impossible to predict, it seems. The sunny, 70 degree Friday afternoon when I made this shirt has since given way to ice rain as I write this. Boo!

    Luckily, peplums never seem to go out of season! Layering is key in the fall and winter, particularly around the holidays when you could find yourself sweltering next to a fireplace.

    Fabrics & materials needed:

    The McCall's dress pattern is listed as optional because any bodice pattern with princess seams will do the trick! For my shirt, I cut out View C (with no center seam) just down to the waistline. For the peplum, I essentially made a tiny circle skirt with the template below.

    circle skirt

    If you've never made a circle skirt before, fold your fabric in half along the weft and then again along the warp. One of your corners should have folds on either side, place that one at the top left.

    From that same corner, you should cut a small circle with an equal radius all the way around. To find yours, divide your waist size by 2(3.14). For example, a 31" waist will require a 5" radius.

    Once your radius is measured and marked, you can draw the bottom curve of your "skirt". Since it's just a peplum, I made my desired length about 10" from the radius.

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    Once everything was cut, it was time to pin!

    Rather than sew the shirt together normally, I chose to add some bias tape in between the seams. This gave the shirt an even more graphic feel, and also hid things a little better if the fabric design didn't line up perfectly. (Matching just doesn't seem to get easier!)

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    To keep some of the bulk down, and to use the least amount possible, I cut the bias tape down the middle. It was then placed between each seam, with the exception of the shoulders.

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    Once it was pinned between the fabric, it went through the machine normally with a 1/2" seam allowance.

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    The peplum was added last and the remaining raw edges were bound with the folded bias tape.

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    Finished, it's a fun and bouncy top that can be worn and styled for a plethora of occasions. Plus, it can be made out of so many different fabric types! What are you going to make yours with?

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  • Wool and Brocade LBD

    In my opinion, you can never have too many little black dresses.  With the holiday season fast approaching , this little black dress with perfectly placed brocade and a silhouette that ensures you don't need to worry about any midsection bloat, it's number one on my list. The dress was made using this Donna Karan double face medium weight wool which should be a staple in everyone's stash.  It's easy to sew, cut and iron  and will definitely maintain it's shape. This gold ikat brocade  is just beautiful.  It's lighter weight with gold strands throughout.  Easy to cut, sew and iron.  I lined the dress with a silk charmeuse. The pattern used was vintage Simplicity 6219 with the following pattern alterations: -Added 4" to the length -Added 2" to the length of the sleeve -Added 24" to the width of the front of the pattern -Added a V-shape seam to the back of the pattern -After sewing the front and back pieces together at the seam, take the remaining front fabric and pleat using an inverted pleat. -Added the brocade to the bodice of the dress in a V-shape (it's light weight and will not bulk).  Fold the bottom of the brocade under 1/4"  and double topstitch the bottom of the brocade to the bodice. -Added side seam pockets   mood wool-and-brocade-dress wool-and-brocade4 wool-and-brocade2 wool-and-brocade-dress3 wool-and-brocade5 wool-and-brocade6
  • Zodiac Gift Guide

    Zodiac sign readings and horoscopes might not always be completely accurate, but they can be fun to look up and share with others! They give little insights to the type of person you might feel you are, or they might just give you another perspective to see things from that you hadn't thought of before. A fresh look is always exciting, so we wanted to put together a kind of fabric horoscope that would do this for everyone to try! Combined with DIYs and other sources of inspiration linked for your convenience, we've tried to narrow down and tailor a fabric and design for each Zodiac Sign that could help you find a style choice for yourself, or even for a friend or loved one as a gift! Take a look below and see which of our sign designs you like best! No one is made up of a single Zodiac sign, so don't be surprised if you find yourself loving more than one! There are only positive vibes in these designs--have fun with it!

    Aries: Sequins, high energy, and bright colors!

    Aries signs are usually know for being very self-motivated and passionate, and that energy should shine out! We think sequins fit them for this purpose! Sequins glitter in any light and make a statement the moment they're seen, which can be a great asset. Take a look at our latest stock of sequin fabrics and trims here! Bright colors would fit this sign as well. If sequins aren't your thing, a bright, strong color can be just as effective for showing off that confident personality. Consider this DIY, especially if you're iffy on sporting a sequin piece! There's no shame in going for a more mature or muted design. You can look just as fierce in this style!

    And with all that energy to use, plenty of you probably try to keep up with a daily workout plan! (If you don't already, consider trying it out for fun!) This phone case armband DIY will make it easy to keep in touch during your workouts or to carry your music with you. Music can make a world of difference during a workout and can be a great motivator for both pros and novices!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Milan Fashion Week | Spring 2017

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    Taurus: Tweeds, stable but comforting and warm!

    Taurus is known for being a sturdy sign where comfort and stability are key! A warm skirt or jacket made of tweed will last forever if you take good care of it (and Taurus signs will!) and they'll look professional. The muted colors tweeds usually come in will also give off a mature appearance. Take a look at our latest stock of tweed fabrics here! Consider this color-block wool skirt DIY if you have little experience with working with tweeds! Practical and comfortably conservative, this skirt is easy to assemble and will maintain a long lifespan with you!

    And when you're ready to bundle up at home and take that time for yourself, consider doing so with this handy reading pillow! Fashioned with multiple pockets for storing writing and/reading materials, this pillow project is great at multi-tasking as it is at relaxing! (Plus it's super cute!)

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Fall 2016 Office Fashion and Styles

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    Gemini: Brocades, versatile, and creative!

    Geminis have a lot going on in their heads creatively, and fashion is a great medium to express that through! Fabrics that are organized with a lot of detail are great for this purpose! Some might think these styles are too "busy," but when crafted carefully (and with your natural expertise!) into your style, they can look stunning! Brocades are perfect for this! Fabrics with duality are also appealing for these signs, because it allows them to switch up the style without having to find a new piece! Take a look at our latest stock of brocade fabrics here! Consider this bomber jacket DIY for a versatile design that can keep up with your need for something refreshing! Reversible and beautiful, a brocade bomber jacket will be just the thing you've been looking to add to your wardrobe!

    Another hidden gem to add to your accessory collection is a cord and chain bracelet! Though small in size, a bright and colorful piece of jeweley can bring your entire look together!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: New York Fashion Week Trend Report | Fall 2016

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    Cancer: Performance Fabrics, energetic, and positive!

    Cancer signs are sensitive to the energy and emotions around them, and that sensitivity comes out best through positive interaction and activities! Hobbies like dancing and working out are natural outlets for you, which is why performance fabrics are a great fit! The more the fabric and outfit flows, the better, and it'll follow with you as you dance your way through your day. Take a look at our latest stock of performance fabrics here! Athletic and charismatic, Cancer signs feel best when they're sharing their excitement and energy with others, making you one of the best influences on the people around you. Solid, bright colors are good, but a print will help you reach out well, too! Consider this DIY for a flowing skirt and matching crop top that won't restrict your blinding and sweet personality! Continue sharing your positive outlook and it will come back to you!

    This adorable watermelon purse will bring an extra slice of energy to your wardrobe! With its shine and bright colors, just looking at it will lift your spirits!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: New York Fashion Week | Spring 2017

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    Leo: Faux furs, intelligent, and warm tones!

    Strong and confident are the usual qualities of this sign's focus, but they're more than just a proud face! Their intelligence is what makes them so strong-minded, and their confidence is what drives their action-oriented personalities. But for all their motivation , they can also be reserved and quiet in their personalities, eager to be there for others. Faux fur is show-stopping and needs a wearer who's bold enough to wear such a fabric confidently! Combined with warm tones, this fabric's style shows off the inviting personalities of Leos. Take a look at our latest stock of faux fur fabrics here! Consider this DIY for a simple but powerful faux fur vest piece! It's a stylish garment that will make you look and feel like a rock star that the world is waiting to see.

     What better way to show off your intelligent disposition than with a neck tie or bow tie? Try this DIY with a paisley fabric to add a more familiar or personable touch to your image!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Brocades on the Runway .

    Virgo: Viscose, reliable, and modest!

    Virgo signs are loyal and positively analytical, making them reliable and dependable friends! Their desire to be prepared fuels this reliable quality, and while they prioritize being ready for most situations, they see this as merely a logical way to live. This makes them a fairly modest and admirable people. Viscose fabrics are both comfortable and adaptable, which fits Virgo signs well! Viscose has great stretch so it can conform and flow when needed, and its subtle sheen makes it a beautiful addition for many designs! Take a look at our latest stock of  viscose fabrics here! Consider this t-shirt dress DIY for a cute and comfy look to make with your favorite Viscose fabrics!

    And for all the modest and reserved design one might think of along with a Virgo, shake it up with an accessory that stands out! Design your own faux fur pompom key-chain and show off to the world that you may be dependable, but you don't mind spoiling yourself from time-to-time, too (which is good!).

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Fall Pantone Forecast

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    Libra: Velvets, balanced fabrics, and soft textures!

    Libra signs are probably the softest and most cooperative sign, generally speaking, and they're good at being around other people (because they love to be around them!). They are a very balanced sign in that they can get along with most kind and good-natured people easily, making them very pleasant company. A nice Lyons velvet or stretch velvet could be great for this sign! The colors that velvet comes in are usually easy on the eyes, which is pleasing to both the wearer and passersby. Velvets are also soft, which would be comfortable to the gentle minds of the Libra sign. Take a look at our latest stock of  velvet fabrics here! Consider making a velvet dress with this DIY! This dress has a lovely flare and a tapered fit that's perfect for the fall season.

    For a little bit more flare, add an accessory like these tassel earrings! Another simple assembly project, these earrings will jump your ensemble up from casual to dazzling!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Paris Fashion Week | Spring 2017

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    Scorpio: Leathers, resourceful, and wise!

    Scorpios are a brilliant sign known for being the truest of friends, and their passion for others makes them resourceful and assertive when they need to protect others. They are wise with their loyalty and honest in all their efforts. Truth can be a big deal to them. This is why leather fabrics fit them so well! Leathers are worn and beautiful, and they're strength makes them durable and long-lasting. Take a look at our latest stock of  leather and faux leather fabrics here! For a brave and confident sign like this, a style has to match to them! We think this bomber jacket with a twist DIY would be perfect for Scorpio, because it takes a bold and confident person to both create and pull off this style! Scorpios who are confident about strutting through in a jacket like this will look fantastic!

    Don't think we've forgotten about the leather! A hand-crafted bag like this messenger bag/backpack combination DIY is what a Leo might be looking for! Multi-styled accessories like this are hard to come by, just like true friends!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Satin Draping

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    Sagittarius: Guipure Lace, a extroverted, and enthusiastic!

    A wandering soul with a heart for exploring, Sagittarius signs enjoy their freedom! This sign is very extroverted and loves engaging with people and the outside world, and being dressed for it is important! Things like statement pieces and conversation starters are perfect for this sign. Other great pieces are ornate fabrics for going out to socialize, like guipure lace! With scalloped edges and geometric designs, these intricate fabrics are gorgeous and stand out in a crowd. This complex design will reflect this sign's complex and interesting personality! Take a look at our latest stock of  guipure lace fabrics here! Consider trying this Lace Kimono DIY for a quick and easy garment that looks beautiful and stunning!

    And to mix it up a bit, try dressing up a simple shirt or dress collar with a hand-made removable collar! These are a lovely way to play up your look without making any permanent alterations to your clothing--no strings attached!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Abstract Prints

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    Capricorn: Cotton prints, honest, and rational!

    Capricorn signs are wonderful people who should be valued for their directness and honesty! Interacting with people like this is easy, because you never have to second guess what they're thinking--they'll tell you themselves! Their presence can be comforting in that way, and they'll always help in the most rational way they can see themselves. Their truthful efforts make them responsible and capable people, and their self-control is admirable. A fabric like cotton--tried, traditional, and true--is a perfect fit for this sign! Sport a cotton print to add a little style without having to put in too much extra effort (though they'll appreciate the extra effort, too!). Take a look at our latest stock of cotton prints fabrics here! Consider this plaid flannel shirt DIY to make for yourself or someone you know! Flannel and cotton shirts are pieces that can look incredible when their corners are crisp and their designs are sleek. Take the time to carefully put together a shirt like this, and this sign will be thoroughly impressed to hear you made it yourself!

    While a bolder print may not be your thing, changing up your style or combining it with one that your comfortable with can be refreshing! Try making yourself a pair of these custom fit leggings for a chic and comfortable style!

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: NYFW Fall Forecast | Spring 2017 .

    Aquarius: Silk Charmeuse, innovative, and elegant!

    Aquarians are often noted for their attention to detail and their never-ending effort to improve, even when others think they're already at their best! This is because they constantly have new ideas that they think their project would look better with, and they don't mind getting their hands a little dirty to do it. Hard work always pays off for this sign! But for all their readiness to do the hard labor, they'll appreciate looking good, too, because they're good enough to balance both! A beautiful silk charmeuse  fits this sign. There's nothing better than someone who can do hard work and look elegant doing it! Take a look at our latest stock of silk charmeuse fabrics here! Consider trying out this ribbon tie blouse DIY made with silk charmeuse! It's a cute and dainty style, but that doesn't meant you can't get down to business and be taken seriously wearing it! Show them how it's done!

    Consider this velvet choker DIY for making an every-day accessory that's subtle yet stylish. Hold your head high knowing you've got the right ideas to take on your day!

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    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: Cotton Eyelets .

    Pisces: Silk Chiffons, artistic, and sophisticated!

    Truly a child of the arts, Pisces signs may thrive best through a creative outlet that lets them express emotions and their naturally intuitive thoughts! Clothing designs and styles that are too stiff or modern may seem boring, so look for or create your own patterns that help you feel right in your own skin. Ornate sleeves or decorative trims paired with smooth and shiny fabrics might fit your tastes better than others! A silk chiffon could be your perfect go-to fabric for this. These flow beautifully, feel smooth, and look like they're from a different time.  Take a look at our latest stock of silk chiffon fabrics here! Consider this buttoned sleeve shirt DIY that uses silk chiffon for a style that will make you feel both modern and elegant!

    For an accessory that incorporates aspects of nature or flowers, try making this fabric floral crown DIY! This is another cute and elegant piece to share!

     

    For some Other Inspirations, check out this Mood Trend Report: Trend Report: London Fashion Week | Spring 2017

  • Mood Style: Sewing a Fit & Flare Velvet Dress

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    In the spirit of Fall, I decided I wanted to work with some velvet. It's rich, warm, and always looks lovely; plus Mood had just gotten some new luxury Lyons velvet in. All was perfect!

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    Fabrics & materials used:

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    Since this season seems to be all about layering, I didn't mind that the pattern was sleeveless - although adding sleeves wouldn't have been too difficult! I chose a slightly shortened version of View D, choosing to use the velvet as the center panels, and the laser-cut scuba layered over the satin as the side panels.

    Each fabric was absolutely wonderful to work with, and the cold dye satin was so beautiful that I was almost sad to be covering it up. I'll need to think up a new project where I can use it again!

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    Since each of the fabrics was opaque and soft to the touch, I decided against a lining and instead opted for some French seams. This kept some of the bulk down and brought the dress together fairly quickly.

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    It's fun and simple, easily paired with leggings and boots or even a sweater and infinity scarf! How would you style it?

  • Mood DIY: Wine Cozy

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    A gift that's always well-received during the holidays is a nice, expensive wine, but it's always important to add a personal touch to any gift, especially if it's store-bought! Why not try sending your gift off to its new home in a personalized wine cozy? Wine cozies make it easy to dress up your wine gift for the holidays, and the gift will be both functional and practical! And what I love most about them is that they're reusable! No fussing with wrapping paper or throw-away wastes.

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    These are so quick to put together, too. You could put it together in about half and hour if you're taking your time, and in about 10 minutes if you're familiar with sewing! Here's what we used for the project,

    Materials List

    1/3 YDs of Khaki Stretch Cotton Sateen 1/3 YDs of Yellow/Orange/Gray Checked Peached Cotton Shirting 1 YD of 1/4" Rust Solid Grosgrain Ribbon 471 Dark Orange 100m Gutermann Sew All Thread 8" Fiskars All-Purpose Scissors Dritz Size 3/9 Sharp Needles Dritz Tailor’s Chalk Dritz 250 Long White Ball Pins The design is reversible, too, so you can use two different or complimentary fabrics to make them, and with a removable ribbon at the top for a small tie closure, this cozy is simple and easy to use! . The dimensions of the fabric cuts you need are 14 inches high and 10 inches wide (14" x 10"). With the 1/3 YD cut of fabric, you should have no trouble fitting this dimension onto the cut if you line the height of you piece parallel with the selvage. You need two cuts of this size rectangle total, one in the khaki fabric and one in the plaid fabric. Make sure your plaid's design is running the way you'd like it to!

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    After you have your two cuts, take one cut and get your pins. Fold the one cut in half long-ways, and pin the long sides with the right sides together like in the photo. You can also take the time to pin just one of the shorter sides together, so that you have a path of pins shaped like an "L."

    Do this for the other cut of fabric you have as well.

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    Once you've pinned the sides, sew a plain stitch down the long side you've pinned, pivot at the corner, and then sew that bottom line along the short side. Trim the extra seam allowance, and then repeat this step for your other pinned piece. You should now have two fabric bags!

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    Next, we have to "round" off the bottom's corners. This will help the round bottom of any bottles you put into the wine cozy after you complete it sit more stable. In order to do this, slip your hand inside and fold your bag so that the bottom of the bag can be folded like in the photo above. The bottom seam should run straight through the center when you fold it; this is important to do, because it will keep your bag centered!

    Once you've folded it down properly, pin the corners so they don't slide around, and sew another plain stitch about an inch and a half (1.5") away from the point. Make sure to only sew through the corner, and don't sew it onto the bag! Do this for both sides, then repeat the step for your other fabric bag.

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    You should have two bags with finished, rounded off bottoms! Now you can turn one right-side-out, whichever one you want to be on the outside of the bag when it's completed. In this photo, we made the plaid bag for the exterior design, so we turned that one right-side-out. You can see the difference between the two bags in the photos.

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    We're almost done! This is where you need to assemble the two bags together. To do this, first fold the raw edges and set a few pins into the fold to keep them still. For the plaid /outside bag, fold the fabric IN; for the khaki/inside bag, fold the fabric OUT.

    Next, you'll need to slip the bag you want on the inside into the bag you want on the outside, (don't worry, it will still be reversible at the end). Be careful of the pins as you slip the bag in! Line the folded edges up, starting at the seams so they're together, and then work your way around, making sure the folded edges are lined up neatly.

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    Sew your pinned edges together now with a 5/8" seam allowance. Work slowly--this top-stitch looks really sharp if it's nice and straight! You could also use a decorative stitch at the top here if you want to add a little extra design. For this time, we just went with a plain stitch.

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    This is what both of ours looked like after top-stitching. We're almost done!

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    The last step is to sew a small loop for your ribbon. Take a hand needle and some of your thread and sew a loose loop into the seam on the back of your wine cozy about 1 inch (1") from the top. You don't want the ribbon loop to sit too low, because it needs to tie around the neck of the wine bottle that will sit inside it.

    Be careful not to make the loop too tight, otherwise the ribbon won't be able to slip in or out easily. We designed this so that the ribbon could be removed easily in case you need to wash your wine cozy. That way, the ribbon won't get ruined in the wash!

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    And there you have it! A beautiful, seasonal wine cozy! With the amount of fabric suggested for this DIY, you could easily make two wine cozies like we did for double the gift-giving possibilities! A perfect design for the autumn season and Thanksgiving holiday.

    So what do you all think? Can you see this being a great gift for any of your friends or family members? Maybe even one for yourself? What kind of designs would you like to do?

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