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elastic

  • Mood DIY: Elastic Waist Skirt

    Tulle skirts never go out of style, and there are so many different ways to make them (here's another no-sew version I did a while ago, here). I saw one of my favorite style bloggers (Atlantic-Pacific) rocking one in the fall and I knew I wanted to make one to wear with MY maroon sweater. With so much tulle at Mood fabrics to choose from, I'm sure you'll have no problem finding something you like. A deep violet, pale pink, or a cream one like mine, tell me what color you'd like to get started making. Elastic Waist Tulle Skirt 1 Elastic Waist Tulle Skirt 2 SUPPLIES: tulle (about 8 yards), silk lining, rotary cutter, elastic, straight pins, pattern (if you want, or I'll show you how), and a straight edge/tape measure. Elastic Waist Tulle Skirt 3 HOW-TO: 1. Double up your tulle and cut it to your desired waist-to-knee length. (Note: I did this step twice so I would have 4 layers in total). 2. Pin the 4 layers together at the fold so they are even. 3. Next, take the fold of the 4 layers and begin to gather them with your fingers and sew. 4. After that, take your silk and cut a full circle skirt out like I did here, for your lining. (Note: I made it longer than the yellow pattern I already had). 5. I don't have a serger, so finished off the edges of the waist and hem of the lining. 6. Pull elastic a little snug around your waist to measure how much you'll need, and pin it. 7. Now take that measured elastic and pull it down around your hips (because if you can't get it over your hips, you won't be able to get it on) and then slowly pin the layers of the lining and then the tulle beneath the band. (Note: I tried to do it 2/3's of the way beneath the elastic consistently all the way around, so the skirt wouldn't be uneven). 8. Sew elastic, silk, and tulle together towards the bottom of the elastic (you may even want to do a stitch at top too).

    Elastic Waist Tulle Skirt 4

    Brandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of the award winning blog, Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on Dr. Oz, The View, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for over a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow; and has been a contributor for the Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, Super Money, Good Housekeeping, and Newsday Westchester, to name a few. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics.

  • Mood DIY: Fabric Flower Crown

    Unless you've been under a rock, I'm sure you've noticed the ever growing floral crown trend, on both girls and women alike.  Originating in the times of Ancient Greece, we recently saw this boho chic accessory on the spring 2014 runways of designers like Dolce & Gabbana.

    Not a fan of artificial flowers and real ones lack longevity? Well, I've got the perfect solution for you -- floral trim from Mood Fabrics.  It can be just the thing you need to do the trick. (Want to see another version, click here). Fabric Floral Crown 1A Fabric Floral Crown 2 Fabric Floral Crown 3SUPPLIES: scissors, glue, elastic, needle and thread, and floral trim Fabric Floral Crown 4HOW-TO: 1. Measure your head for the length of elastic and trim you'll need. 2. Go ahead and cut them. 3. The trim I bought was a little longer than needed, so I carefully cut the design close to the flower. 4. Lay out your trim and glue your elastic to the back (approximately in the middle). 5. Place the glue on one side of the trim and fold in half. Let it dry for a couple hours. 6. Lastly, use your needle and thread to stitch the crown closed. You're all done. Fabric Floral Crown 5 Fabric Floral Crown 6

    Brandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of the award winning blog, Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on The View, The Early Show, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for over a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow; and has been a contributor for the Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, Super Money, Good Housekeeping, and Newsday Westchester, to name a few. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics.

  • Fast & Easy, But Still Chic: Elastic-Waist Pants

    Inspiration: Isabel Marant silk pants from Net-a-Porter Isabel Marant silk pants available at Net-a-Porter, $665
    My dream closet would be filled by pieces from Isabel Marant. So chic, so French, and so wearable. Take these silk pants from her, pictured above. They are utterly elegant, but they have an elastic waistband. Incroyable!

    I rarely sew pants because I can always find a pair or two at Zara that fit my needs, but my sewing mojo was a-twitching at the thought of making chic elastic waistband pants. First came the fabric: this wonderful green wool twill print from Oscar de la Renta that I found on our wool floor here at Mood NYC. It's very drape-able and soft to the touch, so much so that I decided not to line these pants.

    Oscar de la Renta wool print from Mood Fabrics NYC That's the Oscar de la Renta wool in the middle. It's reading way brighter here in this photo than it is in real life. More of a dark green with a black print. Call our wool department at 212-730-5003 to buy or request a swatch; quantities are limited.

    Next came the pattern: Simplicity 1808. There are a gazillion elastic-waist pants patterns out there, but I liked this one for the flat front panel part of the waistband. Figured it might eliminate some poofiness at the waistline, which it does. Also, pockets. Love pockets! Simplicity 1808 elastic waist pants If you sew this pattern, I strongly recommend you take the time to make a muslin first. I did and it was worth the time because these pants are very wide. I probably took about two inches off the outer seam, just to make them a little more narrow.

    Another thing I recommend is to consider the weight of your fabric. The pattern calls for the waistband to be self-faced with your fashion fabric. In hindsight I wish I had made the underside of my waistband out of a thinner fabric, like silk, just to reduce some of the bulk. Or, made the entire waistband out of black silk charmeuse, like the Isabel Marant pants.

    Chic elastic waist pants made from Oscar de la Renta wool from Mood Fabrics  and Simplicity 1808 Apologies for the photo quality! I actually have these hoisted up a little higher than I should. They fit about one inch below the natural waistline.
    Oscar de la Renta wool pants; fabric from Mood Fabrics Detail of the front waistband placket. Yeah, I probably should have made the entire waistband out of silk charmeuse or some other lightweight contrast fabric, but I'm ok with it as is.
    I am so happy with these pants. I love, love, love this Oscar de la Renta wool. I went the whole day at work feeling comfortable with this wool next to my bare legs—no itchy feeling at all—and then I never changed out of them until bed. I'm already searching the shelves here at Mood for more fabric to make another pair of these pants! Want to make your own Isabel Marant-inspired pull-on pants? I suggest looking at MoodFabrics.com's silk prints, wool challis (you may want to line), wool crepe (choose lightweight crepes; consider lining), and 4-ply silk. Now go get sewing!
  • Halloween Contest Entry #62

    Ellen T (center) Effie Trinket from The Hunger Games Costume

    Ellen T (center) Effie Trinket from The Hunger Games Costume

    Ellen T made the tutu and sash with yellow and red tulle, Purple netting and pink and purple elastic bands.
    For more information on how to enter the Mood Fabrics 2011 Halloween Costume Contest and complete contest rules for a chance to win a $100 Gift Card to MoodFabrics.com please visit www.moodfabrics.com/halloween2011/ Rate your favorite costume below!
  • Halloween Contest Entry #5

    Sara B.'s Belle Costume

    Sara B.'s Belle Costume

    Sara B. used 2 different Gold Fabrics and Elastic for her Belle Costume
    For more information on how to enter the Mood Fabrics 2011 Halloween Costume Contest and complete contest rules for a chance to win a $100 Gift Card to MoodFabrics.com please visit www.moodfabrics.com/halloween2011/ Rate your favorite costume below!
  • Feather Skirt DIY

    The use of feathers has been used to add drama, style and glamour to what would otherwise be a normal or boring ensemble. In Project Runway season 6, Carol Hannah won the Bob Mackie/Christina Aguilera challenge. Her use of feathers helped to transform an ordinary black sequin dress into a cutting edge design that won the judges votes. Carol Hannah feather dress Roberto Cavalli Fall 2009 As we all know, the use of feathers is not something new. Most of us have seen it on the runway for the past few seasons from designers such as Roberto Cavalli or are beginning to see them in mass retailers such as H&M and TopShop. However, most of the feather skirts and dresses that take over the runway come with a hefty price and the one’s that are a reasonable price just end up looking like cheap knock-off’s. The best option is to do it yourself. Working with feathers is easy and by creating a do it yourself piece you can customize it any way you like to make it your own. To make a feather skirt is simple. The materials you will need are a pattern for a tulip skirt, 1-2 yards of a wool or polyester, 5-6 yards of feather attached to bias tape, approximately 1 yard of 2” wide elastic. Mood Fabrics elastic trim Mood Fabrics feather trim First start with a basic tulip shape skirt in a wool or polyester for structure. Save the waist band until last since you will need to cover the bias on the feathers. Once you have the body of the skirt constructed begin to attach the feathers to the skirt, 1 row at a time, starting from the bottom. You should leave 1.5”-2” between each row. Once you are finished attaching the feathers, sew the elastic band to the top of the skirt covering the bias of the feathers. It is an easy and affordable way to add a touch of glam into your wardrobe.

    Mood fabrics diy skirt