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graphic prints

  • Trend Report: New York Fashion Week | Spring 2017

    Eager to see a sneak peek of what's coming for Spring 2017? New York Fashion Week's got you covered. We have some new trends showing up as well as a few carrying over from the fall lineup, from graphic prints to daringly low collars, making for a refreshing yet familiar new style to kick off the next year with. Controlled Exposure 
    Altuzarra | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Altuzarra | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    A common trend among the highlighted designers was the use of controlled exposure with bare midriffs, shoulders, and centers. If you're a fan of this look, make room for crop tops and take advantage of your bomber and motor jackets from the Fall 2016 trends to match together this look.
    3.1 Phillip Lim | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear 3.1 Phillip Lim | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Better for the warmer temperatures that come with spring, this dance with empty space focuses attention and accentuate the pieces of your ensemble, and it's important to utilize a fabric that will stand out well against your skin like a bright color or pattern. For creating the looks picture above, consider these fabrics: Graphic Prints and Color Blocking 
    Jeremy Scott | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Jeremy Scott | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Fan of the iconic look? Graphic-printed pieces made big statements on the catwalk with their loud colors and combinations. Color-blocking brought out a great contrast against them, too, and the smooth, saturated colors were show-stopping.
    Proenza Schouler | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Proenza Schouler | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Styles like this are always fun to work with. Solid colors can energize you when you look in the mirror, and a strong graphic can give off the message of your look from a mile away. For looks like these, consider such fabrics as:   Purple and Orange Duo 
    DKNY | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear DKNY| Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Following their debut in fall, orange and purple palettes are still in full swing on the runway for Spring 2017. Their contrast is still attractive, a mix of warm and cool, and they're here to stay.
    Gypsy Sport | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Gypsy Sport | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    From florals to solids, this color combo is fairly versatile. Don't be afraid to mix and match! Try styling any of these fabrics into your wardrobe for this look: Orange... And Purple... Oversized Sleeves 
    DKNY | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear DKNY | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Another return from Fall 2016, over-sized sleeves were generously sprinkled throughout the designer showcases. Good with both light- and heavy-weight fabrics, over-sized sleeves are a perfect transitional style for the weather changing between fall and spring.
    Vera Wang | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Vera Wang | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    You can also take advantage of their design to work volume into your ensemble's silhouette (like DKNY's style above!). Heavier fabrics like these can help you achieve this weighted looked:     Off-the-Shoulder 
    Zac Prosen | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Zac Prosen | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    How classy! Straight-edged and low-cut, many designers showed off their shoulders with exposing styles much like the midriff and center-exposed styles. You could lump them all together into one category, but each type of exposure got so much individual focus, it could be considered a crime not to give them each a spotlight of their own.
    Vera Wang | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Vera Wang | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Exposed shoulders have always had a place on the style board for their elegant and sophisticated images. Draped or fitted, this style is beautiful in its own way. Many types of fabrics work will for this look, but if you need some inspiration, start with these: Low-cut Necklines
    Altuzarra | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Altuzarra | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Low-cut and square collars and necklines adorned many of the models at the show. Appealing for it's focus on the collarbone and shoulders, square neckline pieces can be flattering, giving the appearance of a wider torso and slimmer waistline.
    Gabriela Hearst | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Gabriela Hearst | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Like in the pictures above, accenting the actual edge of the neckline can be very powerful for your ensemble. Using fabrics with patterns or colors that contrast the rest of the piece can achieve this! Consider fabrics like this to get this look:   70s/80s Influences 
    Jeremy Scott | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Jeremy Scott | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    With bright colors and bold lines, a lot of styles carried the influence of the 70s and 80s on the runway for this season's show.
    3.1 Phillip Lim | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear 3.1 Phillip Lim | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    This style is a great excuse to wear flashy fabrics and patterns. The point is to really stand out, so don't be shy! Loud and bright fabrics like these are great for creating these looks:   Activewear
    J. Mendel | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear J. Mendel | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Lots of the Spring 2017 designs sported eyelet fabrics and mesh for a nice, breathable style. Ranging in color and pattern, this style is forgiving in that you can mix and match different visual textures and shapes without sacrificing a clean look overall.
    Narciso Rodriguez | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Narciso Rodriguez | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    If you'd like to make your own activewear style, check out these fabrics:   Cut-Out Fabrics
    Public School | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Public School | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    The last trend to highlight is cut-out styles! This style is more for visual focus than anything else, as their design draws the eye by playing with absence and empty space.
    Proenza Schouler | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear Proenza Schouler | Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear
    Cut-out style looks best with fabrics that can provide clean, bold lines. The appeal is the clean cut, so make sure to work that into your design! Fabrics like these would be great options:
  • Mood DIY: Fabric Covered Lampshade

    I've been staring at a blank lampshade for a couple years now (boring, I know :), so I decided to finally to do something about it.  I knew I wanted something with a splash of yellow that would compliment the throw pillows I had created.  So, with less than an hour of time and a yard of fabric in a great graphic print from Mood, I created a splashy solution that completely brightens up my living room.  Tell me what you think?  Fabric Covered Lampshade 1 Fabric Covered Lampshade 2SUPPLIES:  lampshade, a yard of light- to medium-weight fabric, scissors, fabric glue, pencil, and spray adhesive. Editor's note: Cotton home décor fabrics work well for lampshades like this. Fabric Covered Lampshade 3HOW-TO: 1. Wrap your lampshade in your fabric, then take your pencil and mark 1.5 inches past the point where the fabric meets the other side. 2. Being conscious of where you want your pattern to lay, mark 1 inch with your pencil at what will be the top and bottom of the lampshade drum. 3. Cut out your form -- it will look like this. 4. Lay out some newspaper, and spray your lampshade with the adhesive (Note: It's best to do this outdoors; but if you must do it indoors, be sure to be in a well ventilated area). 5. In addition to the shade, spray your fabric with the adhesive, along with dotting it with the fabric glue for added security (Note: I added the fabric glue because I realized my spray adhesive was only temporary). 6. Carefully wrap your lampshade in the fabric -- I started in on the seam, so I could end there as well (Note: It was immediately fast drying, so I had a few seconds to play around with it to get it right). 7. Glue along this seam that you started and stopped on, then fold back the flap so you have a neat edge -- now press it into place. 8. I wanted my print to line up as best it could....here it how it looked along the seam. 9. Lastly, glue along the top and bottom edge of the drum, and then fold the fabric down, like a hem (Note: If you want it to look really neat, fold it down twice -- feel free to use the iron if you need to). Voila! Fabric Covered Lampshade 4

    Brandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on The View, The Early Show, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for the past a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze is a Fashion & Style Writer and former Video Contributor for Newsday Westchester, and provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics.
  • Mood DIY: Full Circle Skirt

    Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 1 Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 2 Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 3 SUPPLIES: Iron, charmeuse from Mood Fabrics (about 2.5 yards), 2-inch elastic band from Mood Fabrics (depending on length of waist; I used about 2.5 feet), tape measure, pen, tulle from Mood Fabrics (about 3 yards) , straight pins, scissors, cardboard, and a sewing machine. Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 4

    HOW-TO: 1. Take your tape measure, pen, and card board to create your own pattern for your skirt. 2. Next, decide the length of your waist by using this equation (don't worry...it's simple): (waist length + 2 inches)/(6.28).  Note: For example, my equation was (25 + 2)/6.28 = 4.299.  Then starting at the corner of your cardboard, take that number (mine was about 4 1/3 inches) and measure it out from one edge, to the other. 3. Connect your dots. 4. Decide the length of your skirt (Mine was about 18 inches). Make sure you are cognizant of the width of your fabric, or you may wind up having to do what I did and tape some extra paper onto your cardboard to complete your pattern.  Measure the 18 inch (or whatever length you decide) line like you did in Step #2, from the line you previously created. 5. Cut out your triangle. 6. Fold your fabric in half, and then in half again. 7. Place your cardboard pattern on top of your fabric (Note: in my picture, the fold is across the top, and down the left hand side). 8. Since the charmeuse is such a slippery fabric, it may help you to pin the cardboard pattern to the folded fabric. 9. Cut out the form -- this is what it looks like when you are finished. 10. Now that you've cut your skirt out, you don't need that original pattern, so you can now use the cardboard cut out to create the pattern for the tulle skirt.  (Note: in my picture I cut off about 2 inches, but wound up only needing one. So, my tulle skirt pattern was 17 inches).

    Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 4A

    HOW-TO CONT'D: 11. Fold your tulle in half, and then half again, like you did in Step #6. 12. Remember, the folds in the picture are down the left side, and across the top. Cut out the form (Remember, this time it's 17 inches in length). 13. It will look like this once you've cut it out....I individually cut out 6 of them. 14. Lay all 6 forms out on top of each other, being careful to line up the middle circle as best as you can. 15. Using straight pins to secure the form at its north, south, east, and west points. 16. Lay your 6 tulle forms on the sewing machine, and sew one continuous stitch around the top of the waist. 17. It will look like this once you are done sewing. 18. Cut out a piece of elastic the length of your waist plus 2.5 inches (so you can get it over your hips). 19. I want the flat side exposed, so turn the elastic right sides together, and stitch it. 20. Iron a 1/4 seam allowance all the way around. 21. Sew the hem. 22. Now, take the waist of your skirt, and your elastic band (right sides out) and secure the skirt to the inside of the elastic. I pinned it initially in 4 spots -- the north, south, east, and west points.  After pinning these four points, I then added more pins all the way around the waist band. 23. Sew the band to the skirt....and you're all set!

    Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 4B I seemed to have attracted a little fan in the park during my shoot who told me she really liked my skirt. Her name was Alexis, and the following day was her birthday, so I thought it only befitting to include her :) Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 5A Full Circle Skirt with Tulle 6

    Brandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on The View, The Early Show, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for nearly a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze is a Fashion & Style Writer and Video Contributor for Newsday Westchester, and provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics.

    Unfortunately, Mood Fabrics is now sold out of this beautiful sailboat charmeuse, but take a look at these other great prints they have to offer!

    Watercolor Clouds Digitally Printed Polyester Charmeuse
    Mulberry Roses Digitally Printed Polyester Charmeuse
    Abstract Geometric Digitally Printed Polyester Charmeuse
    Burnt Orange Kaleidoscope Digitally Printed Polyester Charmeuse

  • 5 Things To Invest In For Spring 2010 To Update Any Wardrobe

    For Spring 2010 the trends stray away from the edginess of seasons past and revert back to classics. What makes Spring 2010 so great is that you will be able to find many styles that will last you a lifetime, not just a season. TRENCH COAT: First piece that will last you from Spring to Fall is a basic trench coat. This is such an easy and versatile piece which is easy to find at a variety of price points. Wear a trench over a floral dress, striped sweater, or oversized boyfriend shirt with jeans and you have a chic put together look. If you already have a trench coat, or prefer a more unique option, you can opt for a sleeveless trench coat, which you can wear as a dress. This style won’t be as easy to find as your basic trench coat but it can be a simple DIY by removing the sleeves.

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