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zippers

  • Trend Report: Handbags for Fall 2016

    Handbags were everywhere on the Fall runway this season with a wide variety in texture and shape. The biggest trend, however, was functionality and purpose. Here are some of our favorite styles from this season’s top trends! Fur Bags Fur-covered handbags were a huge hit with the runway, and we couldn’t agree more! There’s something so vintage and nostalgic about a nice fur covered purse, and they always give off an elegant and classy appearance.
    Salvartore Ferragamo | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Salvartore Ferragamo | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Michael Kors | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Michael Kors | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Whether sporting something like a bucket purse or a boxy handbag, fur designs can be a great statement piece. Soft to the touch and usually easy on the eyes, it’s hard not to appreciate their unique image (even if you go with faux fur!). If you’re looking to make a fur-covered bag of your own, consider some of these fabrics for your design!
     Black/Pale Gray Solid Faux Fur Black/Pale Gray Solid Faux Fur
     Black Grooved Faux Beaver Fur Black Grooved Faux Beaver Fur
     Silver Faux Wolverine Fur Silver Faux Wolverine Fur
    For the straps, these furs pair well with:
     Platinum Fashion-Weight Faux Leather Platinum Fashion-Weight Faux Leather
    Drawstring Bags Drawstring bags are a great staple of handbag fashion, mostly because of how easy they are to work with! You can make them as big as you'd like it to be, and they close easily, so you never have to worry about your belongings falling out.
    Alexander Wang | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Alexander Wang | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Lanvin | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Lanvin | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    They look great no matter what size they are. And since the design is simple and interchangeable, you have a lot of choices to consider if you're making one. If you would like to make one, we actually have a DIY article about making one with leather here! Here are some of the materials we suggest if you're looking to make one of your own!
     Copper Fashion-Weight Faux Leather Copper Fashion-Weight Faux Leather
    You don't have to go with just leather, though!
    Natural Solid Canvas Natural Solid Canvas
    Black Waxed Cotton Canvas Black Waxed Cotton Canvas
    And for the drawstrings, you can use drawcords or metal chain! Tasseled and Long-Fringed Bags Fan of the Western look? Tassels and long fringes often bring a sense of down-to-earthness, and adding fringe to a piece is also a great way to play with the illusion of body and flow.
    Altuzarra | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Altuzarra | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Roberto Cavalli | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Roberto Cavalli | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Usually made of some kind of leather or leather look-alike, tassels and fringe can draw the eye with their fluid movements, which is what makes them a popular item. Even small additions of fringe can pay off! Check out our DIY using fringe to spruce up a pair of heels by Brandhyze here! If you’re interested in a fringed purse of your own, consider these fabrics for your design!
     Mint Stretch Faux Leather/Vinyl Mint Stretch Faux Leather/Vinyl
    4" Light Brown Suede Fringe 4" Light Brown Suede Fringe
    2 2" Safe Basic Tassel
    Revamped Fanny Packs Revamped fanny packs were huge in the 90s, and they’re back again! Designed for ease of comfort and functionality, these hands-free designs are now trendy and versatile!
    Prada | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Prada | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Chanel | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Chanel | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    While the photos provided here show off a very chic styles, revamped fanny packs are flexible in what designs look good for and with them. If you need some inspiration, take a look as some of these ideas!
    Brown Fashion-Weight Faux Leather Brown Fashion-Weight Faux Leather
     Silver Solid Faux Suede Silver Solid Faux Suede
    Along with these fabrics, you can do a little embellishment with a chain strap, sequin or beaded trims, and clasps!   Halfmoon Bags Halfmoon bags are super cute and in-season now! The curved shape of their silhouette is simply graceful and like no other style.
    Celine | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Celine | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Loewe| Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Loewe | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Any color fits well with them, and so long as you have a sturdy fabric to help keep its shape, you can go with almost anything! If you’d like to see some fabric ideas for halfmoon bags, consider some of these!
     Fudge Backed Faux Leather/Vinyl Fudge Backed Faux Leather/Vinyl
    Rag & Bone Coated Port Royale Laminate/Vinyl Rag & Bone Coated Port Royale Laminate/Vinyl
    Turkish Purple/White Floral Water-Resistant Vinyl Turkish Purple/White Floral Water-Resistant Vinyl
    And some notions--like grommets, trims for straps, and a zipper for closure--to help finish the look! Small Backpacks And lastly, small backpacks! This fashion has flitted around through the years, but they got a particular amount of attention by designers for this season.
    Versace | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Versace | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    Michael Kors | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear Michael Kors | Fall 2016 Ready-to-Wear
    As with the halfmoon bags, their shape is one of the features that stands out most, and like the revamped fanny packs, their functional purpose makes them a great choice for on the go!
    Off-White/Maize/Sky Blue Geometric Canvas Off-White/Maize/Sky Blue Geometric Canvas
    Rag & Bone Italian Vertiver Vinyl Rag & Bone Italian Vertiver Vinyl
    And finish it off with a zipper!
    Black Chain Separating Zipper 26 Black Chain Separating Zipper 26"
      Which of these handbag designs is your favorite? Have you seen others aside from these that you loved, too? Can you think of any fabrics that we didn't listen that you would like to use for one of these styles? Let us know! Save Save Save Save
  • Mood DIY: Leather Pencil Case

    I make handstitched leather bags and for the longest time I was using a ziplock bag to store my leather working tools. But, after wearing through about a dozen baggies, I decided to wise up and create a durable and functional way to carry everything with me on the go. I saw something similar to this pencil case that inspired me, and I decided to create my own template (which can also be enlarged to create a dopp kit as well) for my fun carryall. This case can be used for tools, school supplies for kids, makeup brushes -- just about anything you can think of. What would you store in yours? What color leather would you use from Mood Fabrics?  Tell me below. Leather Pencil Case1 Leather Pencil Case2SUPPLIES: A zipper, pattern, veg tan leather (Kodiak leather is shown here), wire cutters, glue, skiver, glue, blade, rotary cutter, straight edge, binder clips, awl, spacer, artificial sinew, and 2 leather needles. Leather Pencil Case3HOW-TO: 1. Cut out your pattern. 2. Skive just the edges of the 6 flaps so they lay flatter when you stitch them together. 3. Use the spacer and straight edge to create your row of holes along the permitter. 4. Use your awl to fully punch the holes that your spacer created in the previous step. Leather Pencil Case4HOW-TO CONT'D: 5. When I handstitch zippers on, I find it easier to glue them where I want them, and then go back and stitch them in place after the glue has dried. So, use your e6000 glue to apply your zipper where you want it. 6. Use your binder clips for added pressure to hold your zipper in place while it dries for about an hour. 7. Using the saddle stitch (shown here), stitch up your pencil case. 8. Lastly, cut your zipper (if you got the type of zipper I had) and stitch on a little accent piece of leather for a pulley if you want.

    Leather Pencil Case5

    Brandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of the award winning blog, Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on Dr. Oz, The View, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for over a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow; and has been a contributor for the Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, Super Money, Good Housekeeping, and Newsday Westchester, to name a few. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics

  • Mood DIY: All About Zippers

    Zipper infographics-01

    With so many different types of zippers out there, it can be tricky figuring out which will work best for your project. But not to worry, you'll be an expert in no time! Read on to learn everything you'll need to know about zippers -- from choosing the right material and length, to altering and inserting them into garments! Types of Zippers: Coil
    • Lightweight
    • Heat-resistant
    • Rust-proof
    • Nylon or polyester
    Metal
    • Aluminum, nickel, or brass
    • Commonly found on jeans, purses, and pockets
    Plastic
    • Cheaper alternative to metal zippers
    • Often seen on parkas and kids' clothing
    Invisible
    • Similar to coil zippers
    • Typically found on dresses and skirts
      Inserting a Non-Invisible Zipper: zipper 1 1. Lay the right edge of your zipper tape against the left raw edge of your fabric with right sides together. Straight-stitch. 2. Repeat with the opposite side. 3. Flip your fabric right-side up and iron. zippers 2 4. Use a zipper foot to top-stitch about a 1/4" from the zipper teeth, like you see on the right side above. Without this top-stitching, the fabric can pull and rip. Shortening a Zipper zippers 3 Zippers come in all sorts of lengths and widths, but there will be times when you need to alter a zipper's length. This is way less intimidating than it sounds! The metal bar that keeps a zipper pull from going further down the tape is called a 'stop.' So if you're making a zipper shorter, all you need to do it create your own stop by stitching around the teeth several times. Cut the tape about an inch below your new stop -- any regular scissors should do the trick! Oftentimes, having zipper tape against your skin can be pretty irritating. To remedy this, sew a couple inches of scrap fabric to the end of your zipper before adding it to your garment! Inserting an Invisible Zipper   zippers 4   1. Locate your machines invisible zipper foot and attach it per your machine's instructions. 2. Open your zipper and lie it face-down on the right side of your fabric, with the top stop about 3/4" from the raw edge of your garment. 3. With the coil along the seam line, stitch close to the teeth until you reach the zipper pull, making sure to keep the coil within the groove of your zipper foot. 4. Repeat with opposite side of zipper. 5. Move the zipper pull upwards and out of the way to finish stitching toward the bottom of your invisible zipper. 6. Switch to a regular sewing foot, and finish seam. Sew less than an inch of tape at the bottom of your zipper into the seam.
  • Mood DIY: Wine Leather Alligator Clutch

    I've been on a leather kick lately if you hadn't noticed -- making several different items since my leather making lesson -- and since we're in the chillier months, I've been really drawn to this wine color that looks great in just about anything. Call it what you will: oxblood, wine, burgundy....Mood Fabrics has a great selection of that and more that you're sure to love. Now, the first time I made a clutch, I had to wrap my brain around the whole flipping it inside out thing....but once you get it, you'll be making one in every finish and color. I guarantee it. I'd love to hear your clutch success stories below. Wine Leather Alligator Clutch 1 Wine Leather Alligator Clutch 2 Wine Leather Alligator Clutch 3 SUPPLIES: straight edge, silk polyester lining, leather, straight pins, rotary cutter, scissors, a binder clip, and a zipper. Wine Leather Alligator Clutch 4HOW-TO: 1. After cutting out 6 rectangles (2 tiny ones to encase the zipper, 2 leather 16 x 11 inches, and 2 lining 16 x 11 inches), take your 2 tiny ones and attach them to either side of of zipper with binder clips. 2. Sew your tiny rectangles of leather to either side of the zipper. 3. Now this step can get a little tricky, but it's super easy once you've done it the first time. Ultimately you want your leather on top of the zipper, and your lining on the under side. So take your leather and with zipper facing up, attach the right side of your leather to your zipper with your straight pins. (Note: you don't want to get too close to your zipper teeth or you won't be able to unzip it with ease). Repeat on opposite with lining. 4. Go ahead and sew each.

    Wine Leather Alligator Clutch 5HOW-TO CONT'D: 5. Here's on it looks once leather is sewn to the zipper. 6. Now, you'll have 4 flaps attached to the zipper: 2 leather, 2 lining. Line them up and hold the leather in place with binder clips before placing on sewing machine. Straight pins here might leave puncture marks in your leather. (Note: leave the zipper open about 5 inches, or it will be challenging to flip the bag to it's right side). 7. After sewing up all 3 sides of your leather, you'll sew up all 3 sides of your lining...but leave about 5 inches open on one side open. 8. Cut off your 2 corners on your leather. Now, you're almost done -- flip pull the leather through the lining and flip the bag a second time to get it all on right side with lining now on inside. Hand stitch up that 5 inch opening in the lining and you're all set. Wine Leather Alligator Clutch 6A

    Brandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of the award winning blog, Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on The View, The Early Show, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for over a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow; and has been a contributor for the Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, Super Money, Good Housekeeping, and Newsday Westchester, to name a few. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics.
  • Mood DIY: Faux Calf Hair Leopard Studded Clutch

    One of my favorite style bloggers is Wendy of Wendy's Lookbook, and while flipping through her site one day, I came across a gorgeous calf hair leopard-printed studded Valentino clutch that was simply stunning. So, during one of my more recent trips to Mood Fabrics NYC (they have SO much new stuff in stock) while scooping up the fur I used on my fur vest, I came across this great leopard-printed faux fur, and immediately knew what I'd do with it. Tell me what you think below. Faux Calf Hair Leopard Studded Clutch made with fabric and supplies from Mood NYC. Faux Calf Hair Leopard Studded Clutch 2SUPPLIES: 1/2 yard faux calf fur, silk lining, interfacing, zipper, wire cutters, straight pins, pyramid studs, rotary cutter, straight edge, a thimble, and a sewing machine.

    Faux Calf Hair Leopard Studded Clutch 3HOW-TO: 1. Cut (2) 14 x 9in rectangles of each of the faux fur and interfacing, and (2) of the silk lining 14.5 x 10in. 2. Use your wire cutters to remove all but 2 prongs (on opposite ends) from each of your pyramid studs (Note: it's a little tedious, but glue wasn't as secure as I would have liked, and if you leave on all the prongs, they rumple the fur). 3. While I did this step last, I'd like to suggest here that you apply your studs...because once you get it all sewn together it's a little trickier to fold down the backs of the studs from the inside. 4. My zipper was a little too long, so I cut it down like I did here. Then I used my straight pins to secure it to one of my faux fur rectangles, face down. 5. I had to wrap my brain around how to attach lining and top fur....so I played with the concept on how to attach them both. So, while my faux fur was attached to one side of the zipper, I flipped the zipper over and pinned my hemmed silk lining to the "wrong" side of the zipper. 6. I laid it all flat here so you could see me attach the 2nd layer of fur to the "right" side of the zipper, with lining on the reverse.

    Faux Calf Hair Leopard Studded Clutch 4 HOW-TO CONT'D: 7. Sew your faux fur and lining respectively to your zipper. 8. This is how it looks thus far. 9. While sewing up the sides of my bag, I added the little 90 degree notch so zipper could be inset (like I did here with the throw pillows). 10. Lastly I pulled the lining out of the inner portion of the handbag, and stitched across the bottom (Note: you may have to pull it over the lining to sew the sides of it on the wrong side). Faux Calf Hair Leopard Studded Clutch made with fabric and supplies from Mood NYC. Brandhyze Stanley is the chief voice of the award winning blog, Frugal-nomics.com; a platform designed to share with women how to live and look fabulous on a dime. A DIY girl at heart—Brandhyze has been featured on The View, The Early Show, The Today Show, InStyle Magazine, Essence Magazine, and MTVStyle. A Wilhelmina Model for over a decade, with a Business Degree from Loyola University Chicago, Brandhyze provides DIY content to the popular How-To Site, eHow; and has been a contributor for Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, Manilla, Good Housekeeping, and Newsday Westchester. Brandhyze is a huge thrifter and a lover of all good deals, follow her on Twitter @MyFrugalnomics and on Facebook at Facebook.com/Frugalnomics.

  • Finished: The Textured Bomber Jacket

    Bomber jackets found on Net-a-Porter: l-r, Isabel Marant, Maison Martin Margiela, Maje Bomber jackets found on Net-a-Porter: l-r, Isabel Marant, Maison Martin Margiela, Maje

    My first sewing obsession of the new year was to make a bomber jacket. Every time I saw a  bomber jacket added to Net-a-Porter or read some fashion editorial about varsity jackets as the latest thing, I decided I had to make one for myself.

    So, hmm, I knew I wanted to make a black bomber jacket, though I didn't intend to make a textured bomber jacket. But readers, even though I work at Mood Fabrics and fabric is my business, I GET OVERWHELMED TOO! I was wandering around our silk department, pattern in hand, and I was an indecisive mess. Drool was practically coming out of my mouth, I was in such a stupor over which fabric to choose. But then our wonderful, longtime sales associate America thrust a bolt of newly arrived Marc Jacobs wool-blend brocade at me and said "Here, this is your fabric." Actually, I think she just wanted me to quit taking up space on the sales floor, but I grabbed a couple yards of it and scurried back to my office downstairs.

    bomber front 1

    And this cotton brocade turned out to be a delight to work with. Don't you just love it when fabric behaves? When a seam presses open perfectly and your stitches disappear into the fabric? We still have some of this brocade available at the Mood NYC store: call 212-730-5003, ask for America (or the silk department) and tell her you want Meg's bomber jacket fabric; $50 a yard and worth every penny.

    bomber detail

    Above, a better glimpse of this textured fabric and some of the jacket details. You can see I opted to use elastic encased in silk satin rather than the called-for ribbing at the waist and cuffs. I tested a couple of knit ribbing options first, including a neoprene, but wasn't happy with them. I do like the contrast of the smooth satin with the textured cotton.

    The zippers are pick-stitched rather than machine-stitched; I think that's a little more elegant. I wish I had gone with a more expensive zipper rather than these ordinary YKK zippers, and that  I had played a little more with zipper treatments before going the exposed zipper route, but oh well, live and learn.

    bomber inside

    I chose not to line this jacket. The cotton fabric would have been fine without a lining but I decided to flatline it instead with some silk organza, just to give it a little wearing ease and a neat appearance when you see the inside of the jacket. (Flatlining is a technique where the fashion fabric and lining fabric are treated as one fabric, rather than constructing the garment first and then attaching the lining.) I basted the silk organza to the cotton brocade pattern pieces before I sewed the pieces together. Which pattern, you ask? It's BurdaStyle 7210, and you can buy it from Simplicity.com; yay, no tracing involved! This pattern is very well drafted in the sleeve area and overall. The only adjustment I made to the pattern itself was to narrow the sleeve width slightly (personal preference), and to omit the front and back flaps. Other construction details: - Seams are either Hong Kong-finished with satin bias tape or serged. - The neckline finish consists of a silk satin bias piece that is lined with some neoprene I had around, just to give it some fullness. - I hate when the zipper tape shows on the wrong side, so I covered it with satin bias tape (handstitched). - Pockets are made from black silk charmeuse I had in my stash.

    bomber inside 2

    Bottom line: Really, really pleased with this jacket, though it ended up being a little more structured in appearance than a typical bomber jacket. I wear it unzipped over a t-shirt or turtleneck, and with jeans or black or tan pants. Sewing construction actually was easy and it all came together fairly quickly. In fact, I'm now working on another interpretation of the bomber jacket, this time in ivory neoprene with lace overlays....

    Thinking about making a bomber jacket? Really, the fabric options for this type of jacket are endless. I'd consider lighter-weight fabrics with some body, soft hand and relaxed drape, maybe a medium-weight satin. Take a look at bomber jackets in stores and online and see what fabrics work best, then go for it!