Facebook Pixel
Saved ( 0 ) Clear all
Hey! You have 0 Saved Items.

Fabric Dictionary

Fabric Dictionary

Cable Knits

A type of knitting that creates a pattern similar to that of two or more twisted or braided cables. The texture and design is created when yarns are rearranged in different positions as the knitter knits.

Uses:

  • • sweaters
  • • hats
  • • gloves
Calendering

A finishing given to fabric in order to smooth or coat it using high temperatures and large rollers. Used to create the pattern on moires and to smooth and flatten some sateens. Also used for embossing fabrics as well. (See finishing and sateen)

Uses:

  • • moire
  • • glaze
  • • emboss

Pros:

  • • luster
Calico

Also known as muslin, this plainly woven cotton fabric has an undyed and unfinished appearance, and is commonly used to showcase a tiny floral pattern that is either painted or stamped on. (See Chintz and Muslin)

Uses:

  • • pattern making
  • • aprons
  • • patchwork quilts

Pros:

  • • breathable
  • • comfortable

Cons:

  • • shrinks
Cambric

Also known as batiste, this cotton or linen fabric is a plain woven that has good body. Dense and thin, it is regarded for its luster and is commonly used for handkerchiefs, linens and shirts. The woven originally hails from France and is similar to ginghams and chambrays.

Uses:

  • • handkerchiefs
  • • linens
  • • shirting

Pros:

  • • lint free
  • • breathable
  • • launders well
Camel Hair

The undercoat of a camel's hair is luxuriously soft and most commonly collected when it moults. Sometimes blended with wool, it is ideally used in outerwear applications because of its insulating properties.

Uses:

  • • outerwear

Pros:

  • • warm
  • • comfortable
  • • insulating
  • • waterproof
  • • durable
  • • smooth
  • • lustrous

Cons:

  • • dry clean only
Camouflage

Used to protect soldiers during war, this pattern is made with abstract shapes and usually presented in earth tones. The use of camo started in the early 19th century when weaponry started getting more advanced. Today, military camo has a pixelated look in order to go undetected from cameras. Camo in everyday apparel is sported often amongst street style clothing, outerwear, and swimsuits.

Uses:

  • • fashion
  • • military
  • • home
  • • accessories
  • • crafts
Candlewick Fabric

An unbleached muslin bed sheeting used as a base fabric on which a chenille effect is formed by application of candlewick (heavy plied yarn) loops, which are then cut to give a fuzzy effect and cut yarn appearance of true chenille yarn (often seen in geometric designs). May be uncut as well. (True chenille consist of a cotton, wool, silk, or Rayon yarn, which has a pile protruding all around at slight angles and stimulates a caterpillar. Chenille is the French word for caterpillar). Typically used in bedding as it is both comfortable and warm. Aside from bedspreads, it is also used for drapes and beach wear.

Uses:

  • • bedding
  • • drapes
  • • beach wear

Pros:

  • • warm
  • • comfortable
Candy Stripes

The stripe got its name from the nurses and medical volunteers of the 1940's who wore uniforms of alternating red and white stripes like that of candy. Characteristically, they are 1/8" wide and alternate between a color and white.

Uses:

  • • shirts
  • • dresses
  • • skirts
Canton Flannel

Also known as a cotton flannel, this fabric is made with loosely woven warp yarns that are then brushed to create a long nap giving the fabric a soft hand. It has a twill face and is typically of a medium weight. Warm, strong and absorbent, it is widely used throughout the fall and winter months.

Uses:

  • • lining
  • • pajamas
  • • gloves
  • • shirts

Pros:

  • • warm
  • • heavy
  • • strong

Cons:

  • • absorbent
Canvas

Plainly woven with an even weave, this smooth fabric is used for all things durable. From sails to the worlds most beautiful paintings, it is smooth, soft and historically made from hemp. Today, the woven may be made from linen or cotton and is used in the fashion world to make bags (coated canvas is used by Louis Vuitton and Goyard), skirts, trousers, and shoes. It can vary in weight, and make a great base for embroidery projects. It may be used in a number of home applications too. Specifically, hair canvas is an interfacing material and duck canvas is of a heavier weight.

Uses:

  • • upholstery
  • • fashion
  • • accessories
  • • crafts

Pros:

  • • strong
  • • durable
Carding

The process given to fibers to release knots and clumps, combine different fibers, and combine fibers dyed different colors. This process is most commonly used on cotton and woolen or worsted wools. It is but one step in the process of creating thread, yarn and then woven or knit fabric.

Cashgora

A medium length fiber made from the coats of Nigora goats, a cross between a cashmere goat and an angora goat.

Uses:

  • • sweaters
  • • gloves
  • • hats

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • warm

Cons:

  • • rare
  • • stretches over time
  • • dry clean only
Cashmere

A type of wool produced from the Kashmir goat, cashmere is a hair fiber found in Kashmir India, Tibet, Iran, Iraq, China, Persia, Turkestan and Outer Mongolia, and is widely known for its extremely soft hand. The fine fur is found on the underbelly of the goat, and lightweight. Cashmere fiber is cylindrical, soft and silken, and its natural color is white, black, brown or gray (but it can be dyed a variety of shades). Incredibly warm, the fiber trumps sheep's wool in insulation 3 to 1. As a woven fabric, used for coats, jackets, suits and more. As a knit, it’s used as sweaters, scarves, robes and other luxury apparel and accessories. One of the most luxurious fabrics on the market, it is harder to produce and is somewhat scarce.

Uses:

  • • sweaters
  • • suits
  • • scarves
  • • outerwear
  • • robes
  • • gloves
  • • hats
  • • socks

Pros:

  • • lightweight
  • • soft
  • • warm

Cons:

  • • stretches over time
  • • dry clean only
  • • not strong or durable
Cationic Dyeing

A dye technique that allows certain fibers (like nylon or polyester) to take deep and brilliant colors. When catonic fiber is fixed with conventional fiber, various multicolors and cross-dye effects can be achieved from a single dye bath.

Pros:

  • • cost-effective
  • • high dyeing speed
  • • excellent resistance
  • • low piling
  • • short drying time
  • • lustrous results
Cavalry Twill

A warp-faced double twill that is known for its durability. It was originally used to make pants for cavalry men, but is now commonly used for outerwear, shirting and uniforms. (See twill)

Uses:

  • • trousers
  • • pants
  • • shirts
  • • jackets
  • • uniforms
  • • sportswear

Pros:

  • • durable
  • • strong
  • • heavy
Cellulose

A type of fiber derived from a plant. Natural cellulose fibers include cotton, seed, bast, linen, ramie and hemp. Man-made cellulose fibers include acetate, rayon, viscose, lyocell, modal, bamboo and triacetate. Known for being environmentally friendly and bio-degradable. (See Acetate, Bamboo, Cotton, hemp, linen, Modal, Ramie, Rayon, viscose)

Pros:

  • • environmentally friendly
  • • hydrophilic
  • • anti-static
  • • good thermal conductivity
  • • high heat tolerance
  • • easily laundered
  • • resistant to alkali (bases)

Cons:

  • • wrinkles
  • • poor elasticity
  • • shrinks easily
  • • harmed by acids
  • • attracts mildew when damp
  • • flammable
Chainette Fringe

Chainette consists of yarns that are created like the thread chains made on a serger. They are then sewn together using 4-5 lines of stitching to create a fringe. The decorative trim may be used in a number of fashion applications as well as home applications. It can be seen in a few inches in length to 40+ inches!

Uses:

  • • fashion
  • • home

Pros:

  • • decorative

Cons:

  • • holds static
Chainmail

Originally made from interlocking metal loops, chainmail dates back as far back as the 4th century B.C. The metal-made fabric made a comeback in 1982 when Gianni Versace created a new take on the classic which he named Oroton. It was more lightweight, easy to drape and comfortable to wear. The type of chainmail that is seen now closely resembles Versace's creation and has been worn by Paris Hilton, Michelle Obama, and Kylie Jenner to name a few.

Uses:

  • • evening wear
  • • dresses
  • • skirts
  • • tops
  • • bags
  • • accessories

Pros:

  • • fluid drape
  • • luster
  • • couture

Cons:

  • • heavy
  • • sheer
  • • needs to be hand sewn
Chalk Stripes

Similar to a pinstripe, these thin stripes resemble the look of tailor's chalk. The stripe follows a twill with raised white yarns creating a rope-like appearance. This pattern was widely used in menswear during the 1940's.

Uses:

  • • menswear
Challis

Originally made in Norwich, England in 1832 this plain woven can be made with a number of fibers from cotton to wool, silk and Rayon. Challis comes from the Anglo-Indian word "Shallee," meaning soft (and is also pronounced “shallee"). It is usually given a matte finish, however a French Challis has a glossy finish. It is great for showcasing printed designs.

Pros:

  • • lightweight
  • • soft
  • • fluid drape
Chantilly Lace

A bobbin lace that dates back to the 17th century. Historically, the lace was primarily seen in black and made of silk. The lace is fine and features a detailed design and an outlined pattern that gives its design precision. A half-and-whole stitch is used to create shadows within the pattern resulting in jaw-dropping results. It was originally produced in Chantilly, France throughout the 17th century and is still produced there today! (See Lace, Venise Lace)

Uses:

  • • bridal
  • • evening
  • • cocktail

Pros:

  • • lightweight
  • • fine
  • • detailed design
  • • fluid drape

Cons:

  • • prone to snags
Chambray

Originated in Cambrai, France in the 19th century where it was first made for sunbonnets, a chambray contains a plain weave that is made from cotton with a colored thread through the warp and a white thread through the weft. It is close to a cambric and was manufactured along with gingham during the 19th century. It is most commonly used for a faux denim look in button-up shirts and dresses. (See Cambric and gingham)

Uses:

  • • shirts
  • • dresses
  • • skirts

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • durable
  • • breathable
Chamois Cloth

A fabric that is napped, sheared, and dyed to simulate chamois leather. Thicker, softer and more durable than flannelette. Used for men’s shirts, cleaning, interlining, and storage bags for articles to prevent scratching.

Uses:

  • • shirts
  • • cleaning
  • • interlining

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • durable
Chamois Leather

Made from a European mountain goat, it is commonly referred to as a "shammy". Its porous nature makes it great for absorbing liquid and is gentle enough to polish jewelry, shoes and cars. There are faux chamois leathers on the market that are mostly made from Rayon.

Uses:

  • • polish cloth

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • absorbant
Chandelle Turkey Feather

One of two types of turkey feathers, chandelle is fluffy and full, where as marabou feathers are fine and ultra-soft. Chandelle is better for when one desires visibly defined feathers in their trim. Primarily used to make glamorous boas, these feathers are soft and may be dyed in an array of vibrant colors. (see Marabou Feathers)

Uses:

  • • boas
  • • trim
  • • costumes
Charmeuse

A satin weave where the warp threads float over four of the weft threads creating a smooth hand and lustrous face. A charmeuse will contain a satin face and a matte face. Made from silk or synthetic fiber, it is mostly commonly used in evening wear. Also used for blouses, dresses, linings, and lingerie.

Uses:

  • • lingerie
  • • evening gowns
  • • blouses
  • • ties
  • • handkerchiefs

Pros:

  • • lightweight
  • • delicate
  • • soft
  • • insulator
  • • fluid drape

Cons:

  • • produces static
  • • prone to snags
Charvet

A woven with ribs through the warp that may be made of silk or manmade fibers. Its ribs are ridged to create a unique texture, a high luster and a herringbone pattern. Hailing from Paris, it is named after a shirtmaker who's company of the same name still produces high-quality shirting and ties for everyone from royalty to presidents.

Uses:

  • • ties
  • • shirting
  • • semi-formal wear

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • lustrous
  • • good drape
Checks

Alternating stripes crossing perpendicularly to create perfect squares. Checks can also feature alternating squares of two colors. Types of checks include Buffalo Check, Gingham, Graph or Grid Check, Pin Check, Shepherd's Check, Tattersall Check and Windowpane Check.

Cheesecloth

Originally used as a wrapping material for pressing cheese, this loosely woven cotton is similar to a gauze in that it's thin, light in weight, open in construction and soft. Carded yarns are always used to produce cheesecloth. When woven in 36" widths, it is called tobacco cloth. When an applied finish is added, it is called buckram, crinoline, or bunting. Finished cloth is used for curtains, bandages, dust cloths, cheap bunting, hat lining, surgical gauze, fly nets, food wrapping, e.g. meat and cheese, costumes and basket tops.

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • breathable
Chenille

Named after a caterpillar's fur, it is made of twisted yarns that provide a short pile with a fuzzy appearance and a soft hand. It is luminous and sometimes showcases an iridescent look. It can be made of cotton, Rayon or acrylic. Used for millinery, rugs, decorative fabrics, trimmings, upholstery.

Uses:

  • • trims
  • • millinery
  • • rugs
  • • upholstery

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • durable
  • • wears well

Cons:

  • • will sag or stretch if not backed properly
Cheviot

Made from a sheep of the same name, this wool is usually plainly woven or of a twill construction. The fiber is fine, soft and pliable. However, once woven into a finished fabric, it often produces crisp hand resembling a serge twill, but much more rugged and coarse. Also sold as a tweed. Although originally made solely from wool, today it can also be made of blends, spun synthetics, crossbred and reused wools. Used for coats, suits, and sportswear. (See wool)

Uses:

  • • suiting
  • • outerwear
  • • sportswear

Pros:

  • • heavy
  • • crisp

Cons:

  • • coarse
Chevron

With the appearance similar to a zig-zag or a herringbone, chevron is a series of diagonal stripes meeting opposing stripes at a 90 degree angle, therefore forming Vs across the width of the fabric. Commonly seen in men's suiting, different interpretations of the classic pattern have been used in a number of fashion, home and crafting applications. (see zig-zag and herringbone)

Chiffon

Woven with very fine, alternating "S" and "Z" twisted crepe yarns. Chiffon is a diaphanous fabric know for being impeccably thin and sheer (or transparent). It is very strong, despite its filmy look. It is commonly used as overlays in evening wear, trims, lingerie, scarves and blouses.

Uses:

  • • blouses
  • • trim
  • • eveningwear
  • • scarves. lingerie

Pros:

  • • thin
  • • lightweight
  • • sheer

Cons:

  • • snags and pulls easily
  • • dry clean only
China Silk

Also known as Habotai, it is a plain woven that is mostly used for lining, but can be used for blouses and lingerie as well. It is easy to dye and comes in a variety of weights, despite its name translating to "feather-two-layer". It gets its origins from Japan, however, today it is primarily woven in China. Irregularities of threads caused by the extreme lightness and softness are characteristic of the fabric.

Uses:

  • • kimonos
  • • linings
  • • blouses
  • • lingerie

Pros:

  • • thin
  • • lightweight
  • • fluid drape

Cons:

  • • snags and pulls easily
  • • dry clean only
Chinchilla Fabric

Made from cotton or wool, and also some manmade and synthetic fabrics. Does not resemble real chinchilla fur. Has small nubs on the surface of the fabric which are made by the chinchilla machine. Cotton warp is often used because it cannot show from either side. Comes in medium and heavy weights. A very warm and cozy fabric. Takes its name from Chinchilla, Spain, where it was invented. Used for baby blankets.

Uses:

  • • baby blankets

Pros:

  • • soft

Cons:

  • • dry clean only
  • • wears over time
Chino

A cotton twill with a combined two-ply warp and filling that was originally used for military uniforms by the British and French in the late 1800's as it is breathable and durable. It wasn't until after the Spanish-American War that the twill came to America. Chino is now commonly used for trousers as it washes and wears extremely well with a minimum of care.

Uses:

  • • pants

Pros:

  • • breathable
  • • durable
Chintz

A plainly woven cotton with a glazed finish, chintz fabrics were originally associated with calico textiles featuring bright, gay figures, large flower designs and birds on a plain background. Chintz can be made with several types of glaze. The wax and starch glaze produced by friction or glazing calendars will wash out. The resin glaze finish will not wash out and will withstand dry cleaning. It can also come semi-glazed. Unglazed chintz is called cretonne. Named from the Indian word "Chint" meaning "broad, gaudily printed fabric".

Uses:

  • • draperies
  • • slipcovers
  • • dresses
  • • sportswear
Cisele Velvet

Uncut and cut loops reveal a pattern throughout this velvet. It showcases texture and dimension throughout its weave, and is typically featured on a satin ground. This type of velvet dates back to the 1500's.

Uses:

  • • home
  • • jackets
  • • coats

Cons:

  • • dry clean only
Classical Patterns

Patterns that fall into the realm of ornate. These include scrolls, swirled vines, and wispy patterns of all kinds. These patterns originated during the Renaissance era.

Uses:

  • • home decor
Cluny Lace

This type of lace falls under a bobbin lace style where its design is often geometric. It is a heavier lace that originated in France.

Uses:

  • • bridal trims

Pros:

  • • durable
  • • intricate designs
Cock Feather

Used in trims, cock feathers are incredibly soft and come in a wide variety of colors.

Uses:

  • • trims
  • • costume
Coil Chain Zipper

Coil chain refers to the spiral teeth of a zipper made of plastic (polyester or nylon). When zipped shut, it has a coiled look. Coil chain zippers are strong and flexible making them ideal for silhouettes that curve. The zippers of choice for the outdoor and luggage industry, coil zippers are easy to repair should the teeth get out of alignment and will function regardless of the direction a slider is applied.

Uses:

  • • evening
  • • dresses
  • • corsets
  • • costumes
  • • luggage
  • • outdoor goods

Pros:

  • • strong
  • • flexible
  • • easy to fix
Coir

Seed fiber made from the husk of a coconut (the layer found between the hard, internal shell and the outer coat of a coconut). Coir fibers are typically waterproof and resistant to damage by saltwater.

Uses:

  • • brush-making
  • • doormats
  • • fish nets
  • • cordage

Pros:

  • • waterproof
  • • resistant to saltwater

Cons:

  • • rare
Colorfastness

The ability of a fiber to retain color when exposed to environmental and chemical components such as sunlight or bleach.

Compression

A fabric that carries a tight stretch and high tenacity; typically comprised of a knit construction. Primarily used in athletic wear, but also in the medical industry, it keeps blood circulating and muscles energized. It is also seen in the waistbands of tights and shape wear.

Uses:

  • • leggings
  • • athletic wear
  • • tights
  • • shape wear
  • • compression sleeves
  • • socks

Pros:

  • • promotes blood circulation
  • • keeps muscles energized
  • • good elasticity
  • • durable
Continuous Dyeing

A process of dying where the fabric is continuously dyed. Dye lots may run up to 30,000 yards/color. Most often used for dyeing blends of cotton and polyester.

Pros:

  • • less water consumption than batch dyeing

Cons:

  • • high concentration of residues
Conversational Prints

Originally created in the 1800's, these prints are categorized by the pictures they present. This could include animals, sports equipment, children playing, nursery rhyme pictures, movie characters and more!

Uses:

  • • home
  • • fashion
Corded Lace

Created in 1675, some other names for this lace include Alençon Lace (after where it originated in France) and the "Queen of Lace". The fine lace's design is outlined with a thicker cord creating a dimensional look. It typically has a light and airy drape and is primarily used in bridal wear.

Uses:

  • • bridal
  • • evening
  • • cocktail

Pros:

  • • fine
  • • airy drape
  • • couture

Cons:

  • • prone to tears
Cordoban Leather

Originally from Cordoba, Spain where the craftsmen who were allowed to use it for shoes in the Middle Ages were called cordwainers, Cordoban leather is the leather that is most commonly seen in oxford shoes and other high-end dress shoes. Produced from goatskin and simply tanned, it is durable and does not crease easily. A sign of pure luxury, this leather is hard to produce.

Uses:

  • • shoes
  • • wallets
  • • watch bands

Pros:

  • • durable
Cords

A cylindrical trimming that can be made with rope, leather, or satin yarns. They can be seen twisted, braided or as a singular piece. These pieces could be equipped with a lip allowing for easy application in decorative pillows, fashion applications and light upholstery. Types of cords include, but are not limited to, Bolo Cord, Braided Cord, drawcord, Elastic Cord, Rattail Cord, Spaghetti Cord, Twisted Cord and Wired Cord.

Uses:

  • • fashion
  • • home
  • • trimming
Corduroy

Ribbed with a pile made from an extra filling yarn, it has the look of cords (which are identified as wales) sitting side by side. It can hold a similar hand to that of a velvet, but carries a stiffer drape. This fabric dates back to 200 A.D. and was first produced in Egypt under the name "fustian." It quickly began to be associated with royalty because of its warmth and practicality. Come the 20th century, corduroy was widely used for army uniforms as it is incredibly durable. It later made its way into the fashion world. Corduroy must be cut all one way with pile running up. Most of it is washable and wears very well.

Uses:

  • • pants
  • • jackets

Pros:

  • • durable
  • • warm
  • • strong
Cotton

One of the most popular natural fibers in the world, it's origins in textiles dates back to 5000 BC. The immature flower bud called a square, blooms and develops into an oval fruit called a boll that splits open at maturity, revealing a mass of long white hairs, called lint, that cover the numerous brown or black seeds. After its seeds are sifted out, its staple (long or short) is spun into yarns and woven or knit into the fabric. Soft and breathable, it is used in both fashion and home applications, from denim and jersey to towels and sheets. There are many different strands of cotton that all have different but similar qualities. Some long staple cottons are Egyptian, Pima and Sea Island. Cotton can withstand high temperatures, has high washability and is very susceptible to dyes.

Uses:

  • • clothing
  • • sheets
  • • towels

Pros:

  • • hydrophilic
  • • stronger when wet
  • • anti-static
  • • breathable
  • • soft
  • • eco-friendly

Cons:

  • • shrinks
  • • wrinkles
  • • attracts mildew when wet
  • • flammable
  • • poor elasticity
  • • low luster
  • • poor retention
Coutil

Coutil (or Coutille) is a tightly woven twill cloth known to have a herringbone pattern. It looks sleek with a smooth finish. Dating back to the 1800's, the durable and stretch resistant fabric is most commonly used for making corsets. Strong enough to prevent punctures from boning, it is able to withstand a significant amount of tension. Usually made from cotton, it can have a plain, satin or brocade face. Coutil can be soft or stiff, and this characteristic is determined by the starch finishing. This dense, strong material is also used in the manufacture of medical corsets, i.e. Lumbo-Sacral and French "Drill".

Uses:

  • • corsets

Pros:

  • • strong
  • • durable
  • • stretch resistant
  • • breathable
Covert

Usually made from wool (worsted or woolen) or a blend of fibers, the twill stems from the French word "couvrir" which means "to cover". The warp of covert fabrics are 2 ply (1 light; 1 dark) and filling is 1 ply (dark or same as the warp). Its rugged look comes from its two-colored marled yarn (medium and light brown in shade) and the use of this fabric stems back to the 19th century. It came into fashion as the Covert Coat, a staple outerwear piece for every gentleman at the time. Worn for hunting, its common colorways include a mix of tan, green and brown that range from light to dark. Since it was used for riding and hunting, it is densely woven and usually heavy in weight to provide protection in muddy and thick terrain.

Uses:

  • • covert coat

Pros:

  • • strong
  • • durable
  • • warm

Cons:

  • • heavy
Cow Hides

A thick leather that is used in home applications, or cut thinner for fashion applications. Incredibly tough and durable, cowhides are sought out for their large length and width. Higher quality cowhides are typically presented in their natural colors, whereas lesser quality cowhides are often dyed.

Uses:

  • • jackets
  • • shoes
  • • wallets
  • • belts
  • • bags
  • • upholstery

Pros:

  • • strong
  • • durable
  • • warm

Cons:

  • • heavy
Crépe

Crisp and grainy in hand, crepe is known for its textured feel. Its tactile and dry hand is easily identified due to the tightly twisted yarns that make up the woven. Crepes can vary in opacity, as well as weight. They can be worn casually or for more formal events. There are many variations of crepes that include crepe de chine, georgette, and plisse.

Uses:

  • • tops
  • • skirts
  • • blouses
  • • dresses
  • • pants

Pros:

  • • drapable
  • • textured

Cons:

  • • prone to runs and pulls
Crépe Back Satin

The crispness and grainy hand of a crepe is featured on the back of this woven, while it's face features the smooth hand and luminous sheen inherent to satins. It is comprised of a satin weave made with untwisted yarns in the warp and over twisted yarns in the weft. It can vary in weight and thickness, and is primarily used for evening and cocktail attire.

Uses:

  • • cocktail dress
  • • gowns
  • • flowing pants

Pros:

  • • drapable
  • • textured
  • • reversible
Crépe de Chine

French for "Crepe of China", the woven is known for its soft, slightly textured hand and fluid drape. The weft yarns are twisted to give the woven it's grainy crepe texture, although it is considered to have a soft hand and considerable luster. Crepe de Chine fabrics are easy to manipulate and handle, and are also fairly sheer. The fabric is a versatile piece as it translates well from day to night. Heavy crepe de chine is called "Canton Crépe" which is slightly ribbed and now mostly made in Rayon.

Uses:

  • • blouses
  • • dresses
  • • tunics
  • • shirts

Pros:

  • • drapable
  • • textured

Cons:

  • • prone to runs and pulls
  • • hard to cut
  • • wrinkles easily
Crépon

Usually made from silk or fine wool, the woven is heavier than a crepe, but has a similar hand and a crinkled, wavy texture with the "waves" running in a lengthwise direction.

Uses:

  • • blouses
  • • dresses
  • • tunics
  • • shirts

Pros:

  • • drapable
  • • textured
Cretonne

A strong cotton woven with a printed design featured on its face. The warp counts are finer than the filling counts which are spun rather loose. Heavier than chintz, it is primarily used for similar applications such as drapery, duvets, and upholstery. This cotton does not contain any luster.

Uses:

  • • drapery
  • • duvets
  • • upholstery

Pros:

  • • heavy
  • • durable
Crewel

A one thousand-year-old technique, crewel is a surface embroidery made with long, fine, loosely twisted, two-ply staple worsted wool yarns. A firm, dense fabric is typically the base for the design and traditionally features a Jacobean pattern.

Crinkled

A type of finish given to a fabric to give it a wrinkled texture throughout. Most commonly seen in chiffons, however, the finish has been given to a wide variety of fabrics.

Crinoline

Mostly made of horsehair and cotton, the very loosely woven fabric has a high rigidity (or a stiff and durable drape) that is historically known for creating petticoats. More recently, it may be used in bridal gowns, costumes and cocktail dresses. It adds a great amount of volume to a number of silhouettes. The use of crinoline dates back to 1829.

Uses:

  • • bridal
  • • cocktail
  • • evening dresses
Crochet

A type of knitting that creates fabric made up of a series of interlocking loops using a crochet hook. The craft dates back to 1823 but has since been refined allowing a number of complicated designs to be made. Crochet lace became popular in many homes during the early 1900's, and more recently, crochet tops were a hit in the 70's. The trends have since been featured on the runways all over the world.

Cross Dyeing

A type of dyeing method where a fabric is made with two or more fibers that take color differently in order to give it a specific pattern or design.

Crushed

Primarily seen in velvets, the pile is pressed in different directions creating a unique pattern throughout. The finish may be applied to a number of fabrics for a wrinkled texture.

Cupro

Cupro is a type of rayon that is made by dissolving cotton cellulose with cuprammonium salts and spinning the resulting solution into fine filament fibers creating a silky hand. Lightweight, it is ideally used in summer and spring. It can also go by its trade name, Bemberg, after the Bemberg Company.

Uses:

  • • dresses
  • • tops
  • • blouses
  • • skirts

Pros:

  • • soft
  • • good drapability
  • • breathable
  • • absorbs water
  • • non-static

Cons:

  • • poor resiliency
  • • poor dimensional stability
  • • poor tenacity
  • • poor elasticity
  • • attracts mildew and mold
Cutting Mat

A cutting mat with a gridded design used to ensure straight lines. Most of them are made from a self-healing PVC (polyvinyl chloride) material allowing them to not show cutting lines or wear, especially when using a rotary cutter. Some cutting mats map out a 45 degree angles making it ideal for cutting along the bias. These mats are primarily used by quilters, although it is a helpful tool for any type of sewist.

© Copyright 2021 Mood Fabrics