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jacket

  • Mood DIY: Free Microfleece Jacket Pattern

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    A wardrobe can never have too many jackets. They're versatile, and they can dress up or tone down an outfit with ease. For this one, I used one of Mood's new microfleeces and a bit of fashion-weight faux leather for the yoke and upper sleeves.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    I chose to line just the body of this jacket with more fleece. Lining the sleeves made it just a tad too bulky, and it's incredibly warm without a second layer anyway!

     Fleece Jacket Pattern - SMALL

    DOWNLOAD FREE PATTERN TEMPLATE HERE

    (Please note, this pattern does not include seam allowances!)

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    The sewing itself isn't too tricky. Simply attach the yoke to the bottom back panel and then at the shoulders of the front panels; next add the collar/lapel around the entire top of the garment. Repeat with the lining, but before attaching the two, I sewed on the sleeves.  While attaching the lining, right sides together, I left the armholes unsewn. When it came time to flip the jacket right-side out, I could do so through the arm holes. A bit of slip-stitching closed it up afterward!

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    The final step was to add a zipper (I had to shorten mine a bit), and top-stitch around the perimeter of the jacket, like you can see above.

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    Ultimately, it's a super cozy little jacket - great for casualwear or a light workout, and absolutely perfect for this cold weather that's been moving in on NYC.

    What color will you be making yours?

  • Floral brocade statement coat

    It dawned on me the only redeeming quality winter has is the ability to allow me to wear coats everyday. So I take full advantage at least once a week adding a new coat to my wardrobe. When I ordered this floral brocade, the last thing on my mind was a coat.  I envisioned a skirt or maybe even a dress but when it arrived, it arrived along with this green silk wool and laying next to each other screamed coat to me and here we have it.  I lined it with this green bemberg viscose. Because it's such a busy fabric I knew I wanted a pattern that was simple which brought me back to this Burdastyle 11/2013 #116 pattern with the following pattern alterations: -Added 7" to the collar -Cut the sleeve 7" from the bottom for the top half of the sleeve and added 5" to the length with the green wool fabric -Removed 3.5" from the bottom of the front pattern These leather pants were previously made here along with this silk shirt dress worn as a top. mood floral-brocade-statement2 floral-brocade-statement-coat3   floral-brocade-statement-coat4 floral-brocade-statement-coat5 floral-brocade-statement-coat6 floral-brocade-statement-coat7 floral-brocade-atatement-coat8
  • Faux Fur

    When it comes to faux fur, they are certainly not all equal.  I will admit I'm a fan of real fur, the softness and luxe of real fur is undeniable but I think this season's faux fur has made me a believer.   When I ordered this faux fur, I was skeptical simply because I've tried faux fur in the past from other retailers and have been overwhelmingly disappointed.  So I wanted to give it another try and crossed my fingers I wouldn't have to add another faux fur disaster to the toss pile. When it arrived, I opened the box and instantly fell in love.  Not only is it beautiful to look at, but it feels amazing and very authentic.  It has a very nice weight and it's extremely warm.  This fur is easy to sew and line. Faux fur sewing tips: -Make sure the pile is combed down in the same direction for all pattern pieces. -When cutting the fur, try to push the long hairs out of the way and cut the base of the fur.  This will help with stray hair covering your sewing space. -Lining will automatically roll the edges forward for a finished look -Make sure you pick up fur hook and eye closures. -Double stitch seams -When placing the pattern, place on the wrong side of the fur   I lined the coat with a bemberg I had in my stash which is perfect for a high static faux fur. The pattern I used was vintage Simplicity 6632 with the following pattern alterations: -Added 5" to the length   Chandler's coat was made using New Look 6927 with the following alterations: -Removed 6" from the length -Removed 2" from the side of the pattern which removes the A-line -Removed the buttons faux-fur2_mood chandler faux-fur5 faux-fur6 faux-fur4 faux-fur7 faux-fur1 chandler2jpg
  • Mood Style: Sewing a Chanel-Style Jacket

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    Sometimes inspiration comes from the oddest places. In this case, I knew I wanted to make a Chanel-inspired jacket with one of Mood's fantastic new tweeds, but I just couldn't find the right pattern for it. Should I go classic? Should I do something with a little twist?

    Cut to me stumbling upon a Sailor Moon costume pattern. That's right, this classy blazer was inspired by a sailor scout uniform. Crazy how versatile patterns can be sometimes!

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    Fabrics & materials used:

    I went with view A of Simplicity 1092, choosing to also add a lining of the black cotton sateen. In lieu of bias-bound edges, I hand-stitched some 1/4" gold and black trim, which matched the main fabric perfectly and brought out the subtle metallic gold in the tweed beautifully!

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    The pattern also called for some hook and eye closures along the front, but I substituted them for 5 snaps to make it a little more stable when closed.

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    Ultimately, I think it's an interesting little jacket, especially for the upcoming holidays! The unique lapel gives it an almost off-the-shoulder kind of feel, which would look absolutely stunning with some jewelry.

    Are you going to be making anything similar soon? Which fabrics would you make it with?

  • Mood DIY: Free Reversible Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    I love the bomber jacket trend, and ever since I made my first one back in the fall, I knew I wanted to make more. This time, I drew up a pattern for the original women's version and I decided to try one for men too!

    The jacket is completely reversible, so you can essentially have 2 jackets in one, complete with pockets. The one I made in September gave off two very different styles, which I loved. For this one, I kept the inside pretty simple - just navy lining and solid black rib knit. The outside, however, was made with a gorgeous abstract brocade, the same navy lining for the sleeve, and one of Mood's brand new rib knits featuring two dark navy stripes. All-in-all, it looks awesome.

    If you'd like to try out the jacket for yourself, YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THE FREE PATTERN HERE. When laying out your pattern, it should be 6 pages across and 4 pages down. On the first page of the PDF, you'll find a test square and a size chart.

    Recommended fabrics: brocade, jacquard, satin, canvas, faux leather, heavy knits, wool, and medium-weight lining.

    Fabrics & materials I used:

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Pattern Pieces:
    • 1: Front (Women's)
      • Cut 2 of Fabric, mirrored
      • Cut 2 of Lining, mirrored
    • 2: Sleeve (Women's)
      • Cut 4 of Lining (or 2 of lining, and 2 of outer fabric)
      • Cut 2 of Interfacing
    • 3: Pocket
      • Cut 4 of Lining (or 8 of lining if making jacket reversible)
    • 4: Rib Knit Collar
      • Cut 1 of Rib Knit Trim
    • 5: Back (Women's)
      • Cut 1 on fold of Fabric
      • Cut 1 on fold of Lining
    • 6: Front (Men's)
      • Cut 2 of Fabric, mirrored
      • Cut 2 of Lining, mirrored
    • 7: Sleeve (Men's)
      • Cut 4 of Lining (or 2 of lining, and 2 of outer fabric)
      • Cut 2 of Interfacing
    • 8: Rib Knit Collar
      • Cut 1 of Rib Knit Trim
    • 9: Back (Men's)
      • Cut 1 on fold of Fabric
      • Cut 1 on fold of Lining

    1. If making the women's cut of this jacket, begin by sewing the darts on the front panels. This is the main difference between the two patterns.

    2. Sew the pockets onto the bottom corners of the front and back panels, right sides together so they pull out like you see below. The longer side of the pocket pieces should run along the bottom of the jacket, not the sides.

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    3. Place the front and back panels right sides together, lining up the pockets from the bottom. Sew along the dotted line you see below, around the pocket and up the remainder of the side seam.

    4. Pin and/or staystitch the pocket toward the front panel.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    5. If using lining for your outer layer sleeves, reinforce them with interfacing before sewing them together.

    6. Attach the front and back panels at the shoulders and attach the sleeves, right sides together.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    7. Follow steps 1-6 for the lining, skipping the interfacing if desired.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    8. Pin and sew the rib knit collar to the right sides of both, the lining and the outer layer like you see above and below.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    (For your cuffs and waistband, the lengths can vary depending on how tight/stretchy you'd like them. For this one, the cuffs were 8" and the waistband was a full 36".)

    9. The cuffs aren't difficult to sew, however they are a bit difficult to explain. Begin by placing a cuff inside one of the sleeves, right sides together. Sew the cuff while stretching it, or gather the sleeve and use a zig-zag stitch to avoid losing any stretch.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    10. Attach the cuff to the sleeve lining the same way; however, since the other end of it is now attached to the outer layer, it takes some interesting maneuvering like you can see below.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    11. The waistband also attaches to the outer layer and lining. I recommend zig-zag stitching the inside of all the rib-knits to ensure that they stay folded perfectly in half and don't move around, skewing your jacket. Gather the back panel to keep some stretch in the waistband.

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    12. Turn the jacket right-side out and sew in a reversible zipper to complete your new bomber!

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    Free Bomber Jacket Sewing Pattern

    What fabric combinations are you going to use for yours? I'd love to see some finished projects!

  • Silk-Cotton Statement Jacket

    We all know how important it is to have all the basic wardrobe staples right? A crisp white shirt, perfect fitting jeans, and a pair of nude pumps to name a few. So how do you keep these items rotating seamlessly season to season? By mixing in a great statement piece of course! I love a good abstract, geo, or in this case ikat print. So as soon as I saw this fabric, I knew it was perfect for what I wanted to create! Here's what I used- Fabric: Oscar de la Renta Pink/Wine Ikat Silk-Cotton Satin Lining: Chocolate Brown Heavy Twill Lining Simplicity Pattern: #8093 The only change I made in the pattern was to shorten the sleeve to 3/4 length.  This silk-cotton is so nice to work with. It has the perfect amount of stiffness to achieve a structured look,  yet it's so soft and comfortable to wear. Not only did I use the heavy twill to fully line the jacket, I also used it as contrast fabric on the sides. Oh and by the way, I know I'm not the only one who hordes scraps of fabric. So why not create a little self rosette applique like I did. You can either sew it right on to the jacket or make a pin! I was so pleased with the outcome! I LOVE my new jacket, and I have so many items in my closet that would look great with it! Mission accomplished! Enjoy!

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  • Mood DIY: Hooded Bell Sleeve Fur Jacket w/ Free Sewing Template

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    The fur jacket trend doesn't seem to be fading as autumn slowly turns to winter, and honestly I can't complain. With all of Mood's new faux furs hitting the site, I've been dying to work with more of them.

    My first venture into faux fur sewing was just a couple months ago, with a long vest you can find right here (I also explain the best way to cut and sew with fur!). For this project, I made the body of the jacket almost the exact same way, however I chose to crop it to just 18". Then, of course, came the sleeves and hood.

    To save you some work, I drew up a template of the hood I made. It's big and cozy, and should fit most adults! Below, I'll be explaining an easy way to draft a bell sleeve pattern.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    Hood Template Layout DOWNLOAD HOOD TEMPLATE HERE

    If you've never drafted a sleeve before, it's easiest to alter a sleeve pattern that you already know fits. For this one, I took a pattern piece from a button up shirt. Since, it's from something more form fitting than a jacket, I thought I might need to change up the top as well, but after measuring the curve and the arm hole of my jacket, I discovered they were both the same length - perfect!

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    Next, I needed to create the bell shape. I began by cutting 5 evenly spaced, straight lines from the bottom of the sleeve until about 1/4" from the top.

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    Each was then spaced out until I had the desired length at the bottom of the bell. Between the center two strips, I left two inches, then 3" and 5" respectively going outward.

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    The sleeve should be symmetrical, so I did the same measurements on both sides.

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    Lastly, I just needed to trace and connect the dots. The top and sides are very similar to the original sleeve, but the bottom now creates a slight curve!

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    Once all the pattern pieces are drafted, they go together pretty easily. The actual sewing of the jacket probably only took an hour. The side hood panels go on either side of the rectangular strip and the whole thing attaches at the neckline of the jacket.

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    The lining pieces are the same, so they get sewn together similarly. To attach the lining to the fur, I sewed it right-sides together, leaving a small opening along the bottom back to put it right-side out. A quick slip-stitch closed it up!

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  • Mood DIY: Patched Denim Moto Jacket

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    Patches, denim, and moto jackets - all three hit runways this past Fashion Week, and all three have made their way into today's project! Moto jackets are a great project since there are so many styles and directions you can go in. Make it in a classic leather for a daring look, or try a warm wool for the winter. This time I decided to give one of Mood's new denims a go; the drape is comfortable for a jacket and the herringbone design is absolutely beautiful.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    I went with the Larissa jacket pattern, excluding the elbow patches and tabs, and cut the collar, waistband, shoulder gussets, and under sleeves in a contrasting black denim.

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    I added three 3/4" spikes to each corner of the collar. The back screws off, so all I needed to do to install them was punch a small hole with an awl, insert the screw, and screw the spike on!

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    Mood has been growing the selection of patches and appliques, so I knew this was finally the project where I used some of the ones I've had my eye on. A varsity letter went perfectly on the lapel, and I added a sequined Drunk in Love patch on one of the pockets, because you can never have too much Beyoncé in your life. Each was hand-stitched on; make sure you don't accidentally sew your pocket shut!

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    As soon as I saw this beaded snake applique, I knew it need to creep over a shoulder so that's exactly where I placed it! I especially love that when the lapel and collar are down, you can see the snake's little head peeking out between them.

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    A buckle closure at the bottom of the zipper brought the whole thing together! Both of the denims I worked with went easily through the machine, which was great; and while the herringbone had a softer drape, the solid black was a little more stiff, so I was able to skip interfacing on the collar.

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    Now that it's done, I can't wait to add more patches! Which ones will you be adding to your moto jacket?

  • Mood DIY: Double-breasted Pea Coat

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    Autumn is here, and that means it's time to break out the pea coats! Known for their sturdy outside and a silky satin inside, the ever-trendy double-breasted pea coat is a beloved staple of the fashion world. The look is usually topped off with a set of buttons, and they give off  a mature yet fierce look for all who wear them. Muted colors go great with this style, and you can decorate them with embellished buttons or more reserved ones--both look will look fantastic! This particular pea coat was made using a pattern from Butterick, Pattern #B5685. Its design sports a high waist, an over-sized collar, 3 different lengths to work with, pockets, and a 4-button closure. It's best made with fabrics like lightweight woolens, lightweight tweeds, and poplins. We made ours with wool coating! Here's a full list of the materials used to make this jacket:

    Materials List

    Mood Brand Lia Sewing Machine 2 3/4 YDs of Marc Jacobs Double Cloth Black Wool Coating 2 YDs of Ivory Stretch Polyester Satin Dritz 250 Long White Ball Pins 10 Black 250m Gutermann Sew All Thread (for sewing and top-stitching the coating) 20 White 500m Gutermann Sew All Thread (for sewing lining) White/Black Plastic Button - 40L/25mm Butterick Pattern #B5685: Misses' Double-Breasted Jacket and Coat Dritz Tailor's Chalk   The fabrics used to make this coat include a double cloth black wool coating by March Jacobs for the main fabric and an ivory stretch poly-satin for the lining. We chose this wool coating because pea coats tend to be made with a nice, thick fabric, and we wanted to replicate that. A thicker fabric is the sensible route for coats like this, and it's so worth it when the garment is completed; the quality really shows, both in construction and style! Pea coats are also winter garment and should be constructed as such if you intend to wear it for the colder seasons (though there's no harm in going with a lighter fabric when it's warmer!). This wool coating has a soft exterior, a tough, tight weave, and a slight one-way stretch. The subtle diagonal is very easy on the eyes, too. The poly-satin lining has a gorgeous sheen, and it's so soft to the touch. The coat fits nice and loose without being over-sized (save for that collar!) and it's incredibly comfortable to wear. The extra room provided by the pattern allows for easy layering for completing an entire ensemble, and perhaps the best part is the stretch of the lining—it doesn’t feel constricting when you wear it!

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    This wool coating turned out great for this jacket! The contrast between the coating and the satin lining looks astonishing.

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    The sharp angle of the collar is striking as well, and it will give a nice squared shape to your top silhouette. The buttons work together with the collar's design to pull this off.

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    You can flip the collar up while still maintaining its shape, too!

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    And the princess cut of the bodice frames nicely. With the addition of the longer sleeves, this coat is pretty irresistible!

     If you're looking to add a little something to your design of this jacket, considering using faux fur trim around the sleeve cuffs or the wide collar! You could use any kind of large buttons on the front too, or maybe even add a hood! There are plenty of ways to spice this look up!   There are a few things to keep in mind when constructing a coat or garment with thicker fabrics and lots of layers like this one: One is to invest in denim sewing machine needles. Thicker fabric is more work for your sewing machine, and when you have to work with as many layers as a pattern like this calls for, it can be very easy to break a needle if it's not well-suited for thicker fabrics (regular universal needles have  a higher chance of snapping!) We recommend these: Style 2026 100/16 Singer Pins & Needles Another tip is to definitely make use of your tailor's chalk. If you're working with any lighter-colored fabrics, go with the blue chalk, and make the time to mark all of the spots the pattern tells you to. The pattern can be overwhelming if you're below mid-level sewing skills, but having the markings make the pattern much clearer and the garment puts together fairly easily because of them! A word of caution for the poly-satin: this may be obvious, but the satin is pretty slippery. It will slide around under your presser foot, so go the extra mile and pin a little more. Keep that satin from sliding around! Especially with the pockets and the sleeve linings, add a few more pins to help keep the pattern pieces stable as you sew. You'll thank yourself later! Lastly, when you're sewing a lot of layers together (like when attaching the collar to the bodice or the bodice to the lower half of the jacket), DON'T RUSH; SEW SLOWLY. Use the sewing machine wheel manually to go over areas that are piled high with layers or bumps, too! This can save you from breaking a needle! Take your time and work carefully. This goes for any level seamstress. And there you have it! We look forward to seeing your versions of this design and comments about how it went! Let us know: Have you made a pea coat before? Do you have any extra tips to share for making them?
  • Mood DIY: How to Sew a Reversible Bomber Jacket

    diy sewing floral bomber jacket

     As summer slowly fades into fall, I've been thinking a lot about how I have very few jackets at the moment. Which is a shame, because I love jackets. They're a requirement for the fall in NYC, plus they 're an extra layer of style for that perfect autumn outfit. Because of this thought process, I concluded that I needed a reversible jacket. Because why not have a bright, vibrant side for those otherwise monochromatic ensembles, as well as a minimalist chic side for everyday wear.

    sewing reversible bomber jacket

    To create a pattern, I simply traced a hoodie I had lying around, to make sure I had my sizing right, and then altered it just a bit. The main change was the collar. The front needed a more drastic angle at the neckline, almost like a v-neck, since I'd be adding a rib knit collar. Other than that, I added a dart at the bust, and widened the bottom a bit, since my hoodie was knit and I'd be using non-stretch fabrics for my jacket.

    bomber jacket pattern

    Fabric and materials used:

    There are plenty of bomber jacket patterns that you could easily alter; McCalls M7100 and Burda 7142 for example. Essentially all it takes to make your jacket reversible is to disregard everything your pattern says about lining. We'll the making two full jackets and attaching them at the collar, wrists, and waistband.

    sewing reversible bomber jacket

    To start, I began constructing my jacket as I normally would - sewing the bust darts, attaching the shoulders and adding the sleeves. Right around here, I realized I needed pockets. What's a jacket without pockets?

    sewing reversible bomber jacket

    I decided to sew them into the side seams, since that's the easiest and would create the least amount of bulk (remember: we're making this twice, so we don't want any crazy pockets that might bunch up). If you're unfamiliar with adding pockets to patterns, check out my tutorial here.

    sewing reversible bomber jacket

    This is where things start to change up. I made the jacket again, this time with basic black lining. To attach it to the floral lining, I first sewed on the collar. Mood's striped rib knit only has stripes toward one side, so I kept that side toward the black lining. This created a cool sporty vibe that has been trending recently.

    sewing reversible bomber jacket

    Next was connecting the sleeves and waistband. This is slightly different than the collar. Remember how I widened the bottoms of my pattern pieces? That was to give myself some room to gather my fabric when attaching it to the knit. This, paired with a small zigzag stitch, ensured that the rib knit would be able to stretch when/if it needs to.

    sewing reversible bomber jacket

    Now the only openings in the jacket were where the zipper would be inserted, so I turned everything right-side out. You can see above that the knit was being a bit wonky; after a good ironing, it stayed crisp and perfect.

    sewing reversible bomber jacket

    Lastly, I just needed to insert my zipper.  Really, I think making my jacket reversible was easier than making it normal. There were no extra facings or interlinings to worry about!

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    So tell me: will you be making your own reversible jacket? What fabrics and color palettes will you be choosing?

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