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  • Mood DIY: Eye Button Shirt Embellishment

    Need a new idea to make that button-up shirt you're working on just a little more eye-catching? This DIY can by sewists and crafters alike! Sewing up your own shirt is an added plus so you can size the placket a little wider than usual. However, if garment creation isn't your usual forte, you can get the same look with an old blouse, some new buttons, and a jar of fabric paint! Fabrics & materials used: If you're simply altering a shirt you already own, be sure to choose buttons to match the buttonholes that already exist. If you're making your shirt yourself, sew your buttonholes and attach your buttons before you start on the eyes. Once those are in place, button your shirt up. Using your temporary marking tool, sketch an almond shape so that it fits around the top and bottom of the button. Repeat for each button. I used the skinniest brush in the pack, with a small dot of paint to trace over the eyes with Jacquard Textile paint. If you've never used it before, it works absolute wonders. It moves with your fabric without stiffening it too much, goes on evenly, and is machine washable. I let my shirt dry for about 20 minutes and then it was all set to wear! Before this project, I had never thought about embellishing a shirt placket, but now I want to do it to everything! What other button embellishment ideas can you come up with?
  • Mood DIY: Free Flared Button Up Shirt Pattern

    Even if there's 2 feet of snow outside, I have my sights set on spring. I'm ready for floral prints and lighter fabrics, so today I got a jump start on a wardrobe for the new season. Mood's new silk charmeuses were perfect for this longline, flared button-up! The large-scale print suits the length of the blouse and the weight lends itself to a gorgeous drape. Fabrics & materials used: To keep the shirt light and draped, I opted against a lining. Because of this, French seams were a must in order to keep the silk from fraying. I began the shirt construction by attaching the front and back panels of the shirt at the sides and shoulders. Next, both front panels needed plackets for the buttons. Each one was interfaced and stitched onto the wrong side of the shirt itself, like you can see above. To avoid visible stitches on the front of the placket, I folded mine over and slip-stitched it into place. I added a single box pleat at the center back before attaching the collar the same way I attached the plackets.In this case, the collar was sewn to the right side of the shirt and slip-stitched on the wrong side. Since the shirt remained unlined, I finished the armholes with 1/4" binding that I made from the same silk as the rest of the blouse. I didn't want any buttons to be visible, so I hand sewed 8 snaps along the inside of the placket. This also omitted the need for buttonholes, which was an added bonus! This pattern is one of my favorites, since it can be altered so many ways - shortened, lengthened, made with a different fabric type entire, sleeves could be easily added. It's versatility is terrific. Are you going to be making any changes when you try it out?
  • Mood DIY: Free Cutout Dress Sewing Pattern

    Sporting bright green on St. Patrick's Day is certainly a fun tradition, but I've always been a fan of a more subtle look for the holiday. This easy to sew pattern features everything you'd want in a cute day-to-night look; flattering cutouts, a nice silhouette, and huge pockets! Plus, you can effortlessly dress it up with heels, or go for a more comfy and casual look with some flats. Fabrics & materials used:
    Dress Pattern Layout

    DOWNLOAD THE FREE PATTERN HERE

    Pattern pieces 1, 2, 4, and 5 make up your bodice. If you're working with a more translucent fabric, you may want to use a lining, but the jacquard I used was the perfect weight to skip one. Instead, I put the garment together with French seams.

    The skirt gets pleated twice in the front and twice in the back, lining up with the seams of the bodice. Each pleat should be about 2" deep.

    I made the pockets of mine rather large, so they overlap a bit in the front. If you're working with a bulkier fabric, you may want to make them slightly smaller.

    The back was finished with a 24" invisible zipper that I shortened to about 20". If you're unfamiliar with how to insert one, we have a tutorial here! Lastly, I finished off the sleeves, neckline and hem with simple rolled hems. This could be substituted with a full lining, facings, or bias tape! Which are you going to use?
  • Mood DIY: Free Two-Piece Prom Dress Pattern

     

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    Your prom should be anything but ordinary. It's one of the most anticipated events of one's high school career, so why settle for just another dress off the rack? Making your own means it will be exactly what you want, with the added bonus of being one of a kind!

    Fabric & materials used:

    To find some inspiration, I looked at recent bridal and couture lines to see what shapes and colors were trending. Separates kept appearing, and understandably so; the crop top/midi skirt combo looks flattering on many body types and it's a great way to modernize an otherwise modest silhouette. Another common factor was deep wine tones, and I couldn't be more in love. Dark reds are my absolute favorite shades and they look good with so many different skin tones, which is an awesome plus.

    Shape & Color

    The bodice I went with was actually made from the pattern in my last DIY post! You can find out how to make it there, and you can download the PDF pattern here!

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    I made just two alterations: the bottom was tapered slightly, and I made a mock neck instead of a ruffle collar. If you've never made one, trace a french curve for about 7-8 inches, move it to the right 2 inches and trace it again so you have 2 parallel curves. Place the more curved end on the fold, like so:

    Collar

    To bring a little dimension into the gown, I opted to use this gorgeous guipure lace. It's the perfect overlay for skirts and bodices alike, and the floral makes the dress a little more Spring.

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    The skirt was the easiest part of the whole project. It's just a basic half circle skirt, so anyone can make it! It's even hemmed with some Stitch Witchery to avoid ugly hem stitching.

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    If you're not familiar with half circle skirts, I can walk you through it quite easily!

    1. You'll need to find your radius length. Measure your waist and divide it by 3.14. So if you have a 30" waist, your radius will be 9.5".

    2. Choose how long you'll want your skirt and add 2" for the hem. Keep in mind you'll probably be wearing heels! I made mine 45", hem included.

    Skirt

    3. Now you can start laying out your fabric. Fold it in half, lengthwise, and mark out your radius from one of the folded corners.

    4. From your radius, measure out the length of your skirt along the fold and selvedge, as well as a few points in between so you can connect the dots to form curves.

    5. Cut out your fabric, and sew up the selvedge to create the perfect skirt! You can also add a waistband if you so choose, and an invisible zipper.

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    Since I chose to use a poly satin (which looks, feels, and drapes beautifully!), it kept the cost down considerably; and for just an afternoon of work, sewing a prom dress is a great alternative to buying one at the store. The possibilities are totally endless though! You can choose your own color, overlay, skirt length, and more! You could even go with a silk to make the look even more luxe! Are you going to try your own?

  • Plaid Houndstooth

    My love affair with menswear probably started in high school when I went through my men's oversized button up phase with tuxedo pants.  Yep, that was high school.  Fortunately, I never grew out of it.  There is everything classic about plaid houndstooth, and even more flattering on women. When I ordered this Armani wool fabric I originally planned a dress but after it arrived it was definitely more suited for a coat.  The online listing doesn't do this fabric justice, it's simply beautiful.  Heavy weight with a stiffer drape would also make a great blazer.  It sews, irons and cuts with ease.   The pattern used for this coat was vintage Simplicity 8310 double breasted coat/dress with the following alterations: -Removed the back seam -Removed the front box pockets and added side seam pockets -Added 3.5" sleeve belts -Remove the sleeve cuffs -Attached the collar to the top of the lapels which allows the collar to remain in an up position -To remove the double breasted appearance, iron the lapels down ending at the waist Plaid coat_mood plaid coat2 sized-IMG_7688 sized-IMG_7710 plaid coat1
  • Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    I'm always on the hunt for quick and easy patterns, but when I can't find exactly what I want, sometimes I just need to make my own. Today's project required a little designing of my own. My wardrobe is seriously lacking when it comes to long sleeve tops, which can make layering a bit difficult at times. I knew I wanted to use a stripe, so the goal was to keep the amount of pattern pieces down, minimizing the amount of matching I'd need to do. I came up with this cute ponte mock neck shirt that went together in under an hour!

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    DOWNLOAD THE FREE PATTERN HERE

    Fabrics & materials used:

    If, like me, you don't have a serger, a walking foot and zig-zag stitch work perfectly well! First step, attach your front panel to your front sides.

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    Above, you can see the wrong side of the knit I used. It looked so nice that I decided to use it for the center front of my shirt (but of course, this is just personal preference!).

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    After the two sides were sewn on, I attached the faux leather trim along each seam with a wide top-stitch.

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    Matching up the stripes here wasn't too difficult!

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    Next, it was time to attach the front and back of the shirt at the shoulders, however before sewing up the side seams I added the sleeves. This is where matching stripes got a little trickier.

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing PatternAfter sewing the sleeve and side seams, I got to work on the collar. Right sides together, I stitched along the top, then turned it right-side out and began pinning it to the neckline of the shirt (beginning with the middle front).

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    Once the collar was pinned on, I cut about 4" down the center back of my shirt. Each side was folded under, lined up with the end of the shirt collar and top-stitched. Two shank-back buttons and a couple scraps of elastic made awesome closures!

    Mood DIY: Free Mock Neck Shirt Sewing Pattern

    Lastly, I just needed to hem the bottom of my shirt and sleeves! So what about you? Are you planning to try this new pattern out? Be sure to tag Mood in your finished projects and tag them with #madewithmood!

  • Mood DIY: Free Microfleece Jacket Pattern

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    A wardrobe can never have too many jackets. They're versatile, and they can dress up or tone down an outfit with ease. For this one, I used one of Mood's new microfleeces and a bit of fashion-weight faux leather for the yoke and upper sleeves.

    Fabrics & materials used:

    I chose to line just the body of this jacket with more fleece. Lining the sleeves made it just a tad too bulky, and it's incredibly warm without a second layer anyway!

     Fleece Jacket Pattern - SMALL

    DOWNLOAD FREE PATTERN TEMPLATE HERE

    (Please note, this pattern does not include seam allowances!)

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    The sewing itself isn't too tricky. Simply attach the yoke to the bottom back panel and then at the shoulders of the front panels; next add the collar/lapel around the entire top of the garment. Repeat with the lining, but before attaching the two, I sewed on the sleeves.  While attaching the lining, right sides together, I left the armholes unsewn. When it came time to flip the jacket right-side out, I could do so through the arm holes. A bit of slip-stitching closed it up afterward!

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    The final step was to add a zipper (I had to shorten mine a bit), and top-stitch around the perimeter of the jacket, like you can see above.

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    Ultimately, it's a super cozy little jacket - great for casualwear or a light workout, and absolutely perfect for this cold weather that's been moving in on NYC.

    What color will you be making yours?

  • How to Workout with Your Sewing Machine

    Need a new workout buddy to hold you to that new year's resolution of getting in shape? Meet your sewing machine! To help you workout while you continue to sew, we've outline 5 sure-to-work poses that you can do with your machine.  

    1.Wall Planks

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    2. Warrior OneDSC_0457

    3. Squats

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    4. Lunges

    lunge

    5. Triangle Pose

    something warriro

    Plus, if you need some new gear to match your new workout, try these easy 30 minute workout leggings!

  • Mood DIY: Paneled Workout Leggings

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    The holidays are over, which means everyone is now scrambling to get healthy and work off all that feasting they did last week! Rather than go shopping and buy a whole workout outfit, why not make your own yoga pants? They can be customized to fit your exact style and body type, so they'll be the comfiest pants you own!

    Fabrics & materials used:

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    This project probably took about 30 minutes, start to finish, so if you're looking for an easy DIY to start off the new year, this one is absolutely perfect.

    To draft the pattern, I followed this sew-along that another blogger did this summer. To make them a little more sporty, I added the mesh panel to the bottom of each leg, which you can see above!

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    Once I drew up my pattern, all I needed to do was cut out the shape I wanted at the bottom. Since the mesh had a slightly tighter stretch than the jersey, I widened the mesh panels just slightly.

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    Since I don't have a serger, a zig-zag stitch did the trick just fine! I also added a 3" waistband to the top, skipping the elastic inside since the compression jersey stayed up fine without it. The selvedge of the mesh also looked pretty interesting so I chose to leave the leg bottoms unfinished.

    Are you going to be trying your own leggings? Which fabrics are you going to use?

  • Holiday Style | "Velour Jumpsuit"

    The festive holiday season is quickly approaching. Now is the time to start thinking about pulling together all your fabulous looks! Here's a great style idea for all you busy moms, or anyone who's looking for a hassle-free look. Combining comfort and style has become one of my top priorities. Being a busy wife, and full-time mommy of two, can be very stressful around the holiday seasons- especially when trying to get everyone dressed! I thought to myself, "How cute and easy would it be to make a one-piece velour jumper?" Perfect actually! I can get everyone dressed and still have time for me! Here's how I made this quick and easy pull-on velour jumper! Seriously it only took me an hour and a half to sew!! What I used: Vogue Pattern V9160 option B- removed pockets, and zipper. Fabric: Apple Butter Stretch Rayon Velour I went for the more "relaxed" fit so I removed the zipper and pockets. I am able to pull it on and off very easily! The velour is very soft and has plenty of stretch. This Apple Butter color is perfect for the holidays! You have to check out all the beautiful color options available on moodfabrics.com Enjoy!!  

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